Natsume Soseki

Natsume Soseki

(nä`tso͞o`mĕ sō`sĕ`kē), 1867–1916, Japanese writer. Soseki ranks along with Mori Ogai as one of two giants of early modern Japanese letters. Although Soseki began his career as a scholar of English literature, he later resigned from his position at Tokyo Imperial Univ. to devote his time to writing. His first published work, Wagahai wa neko de aru [I am a cat], a satirical portrait of human vanity, was followed by increasingly pessimistic, brooding novels such as Kokoro [heart] and his unfinished masterpiece, Meian [light and darkness]. Soseki's works often dwell upon the alienation of modern humanity, the search for morality, and the difficulty of human communication.

Soseki, Natsume:

see Natsume SosekiNatsume Soseki
, 1867–1916, Japanese writer. Soseki ranks along with Mori Ogai as one of two giants of early modern Japanese letters. Although Soseki began his career as a scholar of English literature, he later resigned from his position at Tokyo Imperial Univ.
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Natsume Soseki

 

(pseudonym of Natsume Kinnosuke). Born Jan. 5, 1867, in Tokyo; died there Dec. 9, 1916. Japanese writer.

Natsume Soseki wrote poetry in the haiku genre. His first novel, I Am a Cat (1905–06; Russian translation, 1960), was a satire on the Japanese intelligentsia. In his novella Master Darling (1906; Russian translation, 1960), Natsume Soseki depicted an inexperienced young teacher in conflict with the stifling provincial milieu.

Natsume Soseki developed his own aesthetic theory of beauty, contrasting it with the utilitarian ideals of modern life, for example, in his novella The Three-cornered World (1906). The tragedy of the Japanese intellectual, endowed with a sensitive conscience and crushed by the external superiority of Western European culture and at the same time not yet free of the old feudal shackles, became the main theme of Natsume Soseki’s psychological novels. These include the trilogy Sanshiro (1908), And Then (1909), and The Gate (1910)—all of which appeared in Russian translation in 1973—Heart (1914; Russian translation, 1935), and his unfinished Light and Darkness (1916).

REFERENCES

Istoriia sovremennoi iaponskoi literatury. Moscow, 1961.
Konrad, N. Iaponskaia literatura. Moscow, 1974.
Grivnin, V. Natsume Soseki: Biobibliograficheskii ukazatel’. Moscow, 1959.

N. G. IVANENKO

References in periodicals archive ?
La lista de autores occidentales a los que alude es interminable, mientras que son solo dos los autores japoneses a los que se refiere con admiracion: Natsume Soseki (1867-1916), y el otro Murakami, Ryu (1959), con quien no tiene ningun parentesco y podria, incluso, ser su perfecta antitesis.
For example, the authors on whom Jacobowitz's textual analysis relies, Masaoka Shiki and Natsume Soseki, frequently exchanged letters (collected in Soseki zenshu, vol.
Scholar, translator, and novelist Natsume Soseki, something of an avatar of Mizumura herself, is the focus of her account of the Japanese literary response to the initial "shock of the West.
Like many other Japanese writers such as Junichiro Tanizaki and Natsume Soseki, Kawabata sought literary models of cultural modernity and stylistic sophistication in European writings.
Tours sponsored by the SMRC had their effect on figures like Natsume Soseki (1867-1916), who depicted the Chinese pejoratively and whose writings highlighted Japanese modernity.
The fourth panel was dedicated to "private & public spaces in the 19th century Romanian society," and was chaired by Luiza Marinescu who presented a paper about metamorphoses of the feminine space in the 19th century early modern Romanian literature while she compared two writers, Mihai Eminescu and Natsume Soseki.
Aminova Nodira, 26, translated "Kokoro," by Meiji-era novelist Natsume Soseki (1867-1916), into Uzbek over a roughly two-year period.
I thought one of Sir Vaughn's lines was from a Natsume Soseki novel.
FEATURE: Granddaughter raising funds for Natsume Soseki memorial
The second point is a little disingenuous, I think, a ploy by which Ishiguro detaches himself from Western Japanophiles who would like to relate him to such twentieth-century Japanese novelists as Natsume Soseki, Junichiro Tanizaki, and Yasunari Kawabata: there are distinct Japanese characteristics in Ishiguro's work however much he may disclaim them (see Sim 34-36).
The paper by Annette Thorsen Vilslev (University of Copenhagen) investigates I Am a Cat (Wagahai ha neko de aru, 1905), the first feuilleton novel by Japanese writer Natsume Soseki (1867-1916), a study on the workings of multimodal satire and the subversion of the Aristotelian plot from the perspective of the feuilleton form, told through the eyes of a small cat.
This study encompasses authors including Tsubouchi Shoyo, Kuroiwa Ruiko, Natsume Soseki, and Edogawa Ranpo, among others.