Naucratis


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Naucratis

(nŏk`rətĭs), ancient city of Egypt, on the Canopic branch of the Nile, 45 mi (72 km) SE of Alexandria. It was probably given (7th cent. B.C.) by Psamtik to Greek colonists from Miletus and was the first Greek settlement in Egypt. The rise of Alexandria and the shifting of the Nile caused its decline. The site has been excavated, revealing pottery of a Greek type and ruins of Greek temples.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Naucratis

 

an ancient Greek colony in Egypt, in the western part of the Nile Delta. Naucratis was founded during the reign of Pharaoh Psamtik I in the mid-seventh century B.C., chiefly by Milesians. In the Hellenistic age, Naucratis, with Alexandria and Ptolemais, enjoyed the rights of a polis with municipal self-government and an elected council and officials. Archaeological excavations, first conducted in 1884, unearthed sanctuaries, the remains of workshops (pottery, glassmaking, and faience), and numerous inscriptions.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Naucratis

an ancient Greek city in N Egypt, in the Nile delta: founded in the 7th century bc
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Sua cidade natal, Halicarnasso, tomou parte na colonizacao comercial de Naucratis, atraves da qual se abriu o trafico entre os gregos e os egipcios.
(114) On the previous day she read a paper at Oberlin College on angel musicians in paintings, and on February 14 she also gave a lecture at the University of Michigan on "How to Organize a Library." She returned to Ann Arbor a year later to address the Honors Assembly at the School of Music on the subject of "Musical Angels and the Dance of Death." (115) The most serious diversion was the preparation of a manuscript titled "Athenaeus, ausgewahlte Kapitel uber Musik aus den Deipnosophisten," about the treatment of music in the Deipnosphistai (Gastronomers), an enormous work (fifteen books survive) by the third-century Greek grammarian Athenaeus of Naucratis, in which learned men hold a conversation at a banquet, and her three-year-long attempt to have Barenreiter publish it.
It was already known that the potters of Naucratis, a Greek town in Egypt, would regularly 'baptise' their wares in order to make them look like silver, and all became dear with the publication in 1984 of a papyrus fragment of the pre-Socratic philosopher Thrasyalces, who declared that 'silver is black' (as indeed it readily can be, especially near the sea--which is where most Greek black-gloss wares were made).
300112, with image]; a fragment from a closed shape from Naucratis attributed to the Manner of Gorgon Painter ("may be the painter himself"), Oxford, Ashmolean G 550, ABV 13, no.
The illustrations are well chosen to make the author's points, and they offer many views of less well-known monuments, including an underwater photograph of the recently found duplicate to the Naucratis stela.