Naucratis


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Naucratis

(nŏk`rətĭs), ancient city of Egypt, on the Canopic branch of the Nile, 45 mi (72 km) SE of Alexandria. It was probably given (7th cent. B.C.) by Psamtik to Greek colonists from Miletus and was the first Greek settlement in Egypt. The rise of Alexandria and the shifting of the Nile caused its decline. The site has been excavated, revealing pottery of a Greek type and ruins of Greek temples.

Naucratis

 

an ancient Greek colony in Egypt, in the western part of the Nile Delta. Naucratis was founded during the reign of Pharaoh Psamtik I in the mid-seventh century B.C., chiefly by Milesians. In the Hellenistic age, Naucratis, with Alexandria and Ptolemais, enjoyed the rights of a polis with municipal self-government and an elected council and officials. Archaeological excavations, first conducted in 1884, unearthed sanctuaries, the remains of workshops (pottery, glassmaking, and faience), and numerous inscriptions.

Naucratis

an ancient Greek city in N Egypt, in the Nile delta: founded in the 7th century bc
References in periodicals archive ?
It was already known that the potters of Naucratis, a Greek town in Egypt, would regularly 'baptise' their wares in order to make them look like silver, and all became dear with the publication in 1984 of a papyrus fragment of the pre-Socratic philosopher Thrasyalces, who declared that 'silver is black' (as indeed it readily can be, especially near the sea--which is where most Greek black-gloss wares were made).
Por increibles que resulten tales amores, estos podian llegar a ser tambien un tanto repulsivos, si creemos la narracion de Ateneo de Naucratis en el Banquete de los eruditos.
300112, with image]; a fragment from a closed shape from Naucratis attributed to the Manner of Gorgon Painter ("may be the painter himself"), Oxford, Ashmolean G 550, ABV 13, no.
The illustrations are well chosen to make the author's points, and they offer many views of less well-known monuments, including an underwater photograph of the recently found duplicate to the Naucratis stela.
En efecto, los planos del arquitecto Dinocrates se transformaron en realidad gracias al trabajo de financiamiento y direccion de las obras por parte del ministro Cleomenes de Naucratis, en ausencia de Alejandro, que habia continuado su casi inverosimil expedicion.
What Posidippus predicted is that Sappho's poem about an Egyptian girl named Doricha, of the town of Naucratis, would cause Doricha to live in the minds of readers as long as ships shall sail the Nile.
In a rare reference to pottery decoration in ancient literature, the potters of Naucratis are said to have `baptised' their pots so as to make them resemble silver.
The story is that in the region of Naucratis in Egypt there dwelt one of the old gods of the country, the god to whom the bird called Ibis is sacred, his own name being Theuth.
Por entonces, Safo sufrio otro desencanto: enardecio al saber que su hermano Kharaxos queria casar con una prostituta que habia conocido en el muelle de Naucratis, en Egipto.
Naucratis, the Persian attacks on Greece and the Athenian reaction, and Alexander's victory (`by no means a foregone conclusion', 675).
The Greeks of Naucratis and Memphis,(85) and the Boeotian community Alexander the Great discovered near Babylon,(86) are the best-known examples (non-Greek examples are, significantly, harder to find).
If, as Wright plausibly suggests, (39) the passage from Pollux of Naucratis quoted by Philostratus in the Lives of the Sophists (VS 593) was part of a declamation on the versatility of sophists, it would provide a further example of an association of a praiseworthy versatility with the Homeric figure.