Navaho


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Navaho:

see NavajoNavajo
or Navaho
, Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Athabascan branch of the Nadene linguistic stock (see Native American languages). A migration from the North to the Southwest area is thought to have occurred in the past because of an affiliation
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, people; NavajoNavajo
or Navaho,
language belonging to the Athabascan branch of the Nadene linguistic family, or stock, of North America (including Mexico). See Native American languages.
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, language.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Navaho

 

(self-designation, Dene), an Indian people in the USA. They live on four reservations in the states of New Mexico and Arizona and number more than 100,000 (1970, estimate). Their language is related to the Athapaskan languages. The Navaho belong to various Christian sects. They were originally woodland hunters and fishermen in the northern part of North America; in the 14th and 15th centuries they migrated to the Southwest, where they took up hoe farming and, at a later date, livestock raising. The present-day Navaho engage primarily in livestock raising. They are actively involved in the movement to improve the life of American Indians and to eliminate racial discrimination. They publish the newspaper Navaho Times.

REFERENCES

Narody Ameriki, vol. 1. Moscow, 1959.
Vogt, E. Navaho Veterans. Cambridge, 1951.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Navaho

(dreams)

Dreams constitute fundamental elements in the everyday life of the Navaho, who generally do not comment publicly on their dreams, which are often regarded as warnings. Dream specialists are usually consulted in order to discover the cause of the dream, what is going to happen, and how to prevent the anticipated event. The diagnostician, often in a trance state, can discover the cause of the dream as well as the dreamer’s sickness.

It has been frequently observed that myths play a significant role in the daily lives of the Navaho, and many of them are performed repeatedly in winter. The influence of the mythic narratives on the dreams of the Navaho has often been pointed out. A considerable number of dream interpretations are persistently believed, because later events have corroborated a sufficient percentage of them.

The Navaho, like other people, divide dreams into good and bad, although they are not inclined to arrange gods or other phenomena in categories. They have easily accomplished rituals for dealing with the causes and the results of bad dreams, one of the most common of which is praying at sunrise. Many apparently bad dreams may have an opposite meaning, which is usually revealed by the natural course of events. Among the Navaho, most common unpleasant dreams are minimized or ignored because others have had similar dreams and nothing serious has happened. However, certain particular kinds of dreams are believed to cause sickness and to require diagnosis and treatment. One dream belonging to this category is the falling dream.

Another group of dreams may be designated death dreams, of which various interpretations are offered. For instance, if during a ceremony a shaman dreams that his patient is going to die, he must leave and allow another shaman to be called. Also, when a Navaho dreams that he is dead, he interprets that as meaning that in his dream he was in the next world with the spirits of the dead. To dream of being there and to come back does not necessarily represent a bad omen: but if the dreamer shakes hands with the dead, it means that he is going to die.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

Navaho

[′nä·və‚hō]
(ordnance)
A U.S. Air Force surface-to-surface long-range supersonic strategic missile, powered by two ramjet engines.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, fruit flies were not recovered from fruit samples of the blackberry cultivar Navaho, which is interesting from both an agronomic and scientific perspective.
Commercial director of Navaho Coffee Asam Salim said: "Cobalt Park is the perfect location for us and the support we have received has been fantastic."
* Manuelito's Navaho name was Ashkii Diyinii, Holy Boy.
How long would it be until a Navaho hogan suddenly appeared by a subway line or an Aztec temple near the hot dog vendor?
Wed''ze Flow Fit thermal top, pounds 14.99, Decathlon Wed''ze Flow Fit thermal top, pounds 14.99, Decathlon Nikita Remarkable snow pants, pounds 158.99, Surfdome Victoria fairisle dress, pounds 35; Georgina duck down gilet, pounds 68; chunky cable knit toggle cardigan, pounds 72; Navaho scarf, pounds 12; Yogi gloves, pounds 18 and Debbie duffle coat, pounds 50; Samia stripe tee, pounds 20; Contour slim fit jeans, pounds 48; Fairisle trapper hat, pounds 10; Cloud long cuff gloves, pounds 5, all Fat Face
Green ST, Urbana, IL 61801 OR United Church of Christ @ 104 East Navaho, Shabbona, IL 60550.
Brisbane, Australia, May 5, 2011 - (ABN Newswire) - D'Aguilar Gold Limited (ASX:DGR) are pleased to draw the attention of shareholders to this morning's announcement by Navaho Gold Limited (ASX:NVG) regarding the commencement of drilling on its Steven's Basin Project in Nevada, USA.
Instead, John found funding for a field study on the Navaho Indian Reservation in the Ramah area south of Gallup, New Mexico.
Furthermore, this newest edition updates and even expands many of the entries (compare, e.g., the entries for the Virgin Mary and for Estsanatlehi, the Navaho sky goddess, in all three editions) and, unlike the earlier ones, provides references for all entries.
His first airplane, the Piper Aztec, transported Anguillans between islands, and Lloyd eventually operated a fleet of seven aircraft including a Cessna, Islander, Navaho, and Queen Air Beechcraft.
Tony Hillerman's Joe Leaphom and Jim Chee do their deducing on the Navaho tribal lands.
Is the vernacular of style that we see then a true vernacular or a commodified simulation produced so as to sell more Cajun stuff in New Orleans, more Navaho stuff in Arizona, all of it made and mass marketed by capitalism?