nave

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nave

(nāv), in general, all that part of a church that extends from the atrium to the altar and is intended exclusively for the laity. In a strictly architectural sense, however, the term indicates only the central aisle, excluding side aisles. The floor plan of a wide central portion with narrower aisles on either side existed in the typical hypostylehypostyle
, the chamber in Egyptian temples in which a number of columns supported a flat stone roof. Forming the chief and largest inner space of the temple, it was entered from the outer courtyard and, in turn, gave access to the holy of holies and the small inner sanctuaries
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 hall of Egyptian temples and later in the Roman civic basilicas. From the latter it passed into the churches of the early Middle Ages and gradually to Gothic cathedrals. The nave, in the developed Gothic style, became the main body of the structure. Internally the piers, rising the full height of the nave walls to carry the ribs of the four-part vault or sexpartite vault, divided the walls into a series of bays in which three features, ground floor arcade, triforiumtriforium
, in church architecture, an arcaded gallery above the arches of the nave. In the interiors of medieval churches each bay of the nave wall customarily had three divisions in its height—arcade, triforium, and clerestory.
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, and clerestoryclerestory
or clearstory
, a part of a building whose walls rise higher than the roofs of adjoining parts of the structure. Pierced by windows, it is chiefly a device for obtaining extra light.
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, were evident, one above another.

Nave

The principal or central part of a church; by extension, both middle and side aisles of a church, from the entrance to the crossing of the chancel; that part of the church intended for the general public.

nave

nave, 1, nave arcade
1. The middle aisle of a church.
2. By extension, both middle and side aisles of a church from the entrance to the crossing or chancel.
3. That part of the church intended primarily for the laity.

nave

the central space in a church, extending from the narthex to the chancel and often flanked by aisles
References in periodicals archive ?
UK-based shipping, marine, energy, offshore and insurance industries services provider Braemar Shipping Services plc (LSE: BMS) is acquiring the entire issued share capital of German corporate finance advisory business Naves Corporate Finance GmbH, the company said.
Maria del Carmen Bobes Naves, Victor Alperi, escritor.
The church has three naves with dominant central nave.
This is not to say, however, that businesses must make it their chief goal to keep the courts happy, according to Ron Naves, who, as senior vice president of legal affairs and litigation, oversees Gem-star-TV Guide's efforts to comply with the new rules.
This competition-winning church design by Massimiliano Fuksas comprises two parallelepipeds inserted one inside the other, creating three naves. The first external structure is made of reinforced concrete treated with wax, whereas the second is made of cellular cement and pierced with rays of light from different sources.
France capitalised on a nervy start by England to race into a 14-0 lead with tries by Julien Malzieu and Jerome Naves, only for Ugo Monye and Phil Dowson tries to cut the deficit.
That is, in both cases the main part of the building is bipartite, comprising a nave and separate sanctuary; in plan, both naves are proportioned 2:1 in length and width, respectively 40 by 20 cubits and 144 by 72 braccia; and in both buildings the sanctuaries rise over centralized plans with diameters equal to the nave width, in one case a 20 cubit square, the other a 72 braccia octagon (leaving aside here the peripheral tribunes).
Designed by the Naves' son Jim, the 8- by 10-foot shed with a corrugated tin roof provides a place for potting and tool storage.