Nazarite


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Nazarite: Nazarene

Nazarite

(năz`ərīt') [Heb. nazir=consecrated], in the Bible, a man dedicated to God. The Nazarite, after taking a special vow, abstained from intoxicating beverages, never cut his hair, and avoided corpses. An inadvertent breach of these rules called for purificatory rites. His vow was for a fixed term (though it could also be for life), at the end of which he was released. Samuel, the prophet, and Samson were Nazarites. The name is also spelled Nazirite.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Nazarite vow also forbids Nyahbinghi Rastas from eating grapes, whether dried or moist, or anything else that grows on the vine trees (Num.
Josephus recounts the Nazarite vow of Bernice, the sister of Herod Agrippa in reaction to the slaughter of Jews by the Roman governor Florus, shaving her head (if it was).
high, hunchbacked with a long face, long nose, and meeting eyebrows, so they who see him might be affrighted, with scanty hair with a parting in the middle of his head, after the manner of the Nazarites, and with an undeveloped beard.
Then they all forgave the pretty sinner, who had so much good in her after all, and Bee and Sister Rhoda Ann Baker were the very best of friends, and more than once Rhoda Ann's plain Nazarite bonnet had been seen in the little phaeton side by side with Bee's stylish Paris hat, on which the good woman scarcely dared to look lest it should move her from her serene height of plainness and humility.
Shylock: Yes, to smell pork, to eat of the habitation which your prophet the Nazarite conjured the devil into
3) heaped scorn on the idea of dining with people who would "eat of the habitation which [their] prophet the Nazarite conjured the devil into.
In the course of his text, Milton transforms "the Jewish idea of the Nazarite as 'separate to God' .
For instance, looking at Samson Agonistes, he notes that "from the Philistine perspective, Samson is a suicidal fundamentalist member of the ascetic Nazarite sect.
Rituals of Fertility and the Sacrifice of Desire: Nazarite Women's Performance in South Africa.
When Jerome writes that Jovinian "praises Samson and exalts the uxorious Nazarite with amazing adulation," Erasmus comments: "What should have been condemned in Samson, that man foolishly (stulte) praises.
The first, Samson the Nazarite (1926), has been translated into English twice.
Furthermore, by not taking seriously other biblical accounts, we must wonder why, for example, barren Hannah did not consult her husband when she vowed to make her son a Nazarite, if God would grant her a child.