Nazarite

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Nazarite

(năz`ərīt') [Heb. nazir=consecrated], in the Bible, a man dedicated to God. The Nazarite, after taking a special vow, abstained from intoxicating beverages, never cut his hair, and avoided corpses. An inadvertent breach of these rules called for purificatory rites. His vow was for a fixed term (though it could also be for life), at the end of which he was released. Samuel, the prophet, and Samson were Nazarites. The name is also spelled Nazirite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though not a Nazirite, Absalom let his hair grow long, and beyond this the events of his life parallel Samson in a number of significant ways.
38) In addition, the practices of not cutting the hair and avoiding the dead--precepts of the Nazirite vow observed by the House of David--were also observed by members of the Seventh Elect Church.
O'Grady's linguistic analysis of the instructions for menstruation (Lev 15:19-31) demonstrates that their focus, like that of the regulations for Nazirite vows (Num 6:1-21), is not on punishment for immorality or abnormality, but on "the practice of separation as a means for maintaining the sanctified order" (27-28).
The lad was to be a Nazirite, one of a chosen group whose hair was never cut.
And this lacuna is all the more significant in that it relates to two institutions -- the (temporary) Nazirite and the High Priesthood -- which abruptly ceased to operate with the destruction of the Temple.
The voluntary nature of sectarianism as conceived in the Damascus Document is apparent when sectarian life is described in terms of the Nazirite, the paramount Biblical example of someone who undertook voluntary restrictions (40266 1.
Samson possessed extraordinary physical strength, and the moral of his saga connects the disastrous loss of his power with the violation of his Nazirite vow.
The subject is introduced with the words, "Speak to the children of Israel and say to them: When a man or woman shall clearly utter a vow, the vow of a nazirite, to consecrate himself to the Lord.
And the Lord spoke unto Moses, saying: Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them: When either man or woman shall clearly utter a vow, the vow of a Nazirite, to consecrate himself unto the Lord, he shall abstain from wine and strong drink .
Stone, in an elegant analysis of the talmudic passage Sotah 2a, examines the nature of the nazirite vows and the ordeal of the wife suspected of adultery, suggesting that both situations have something to say about the intrinsic violence of vows.
However, the fact the wedding miracle has the special status of being the first sign which revealed Jesus' glory to the disciples (including those whom Jesus has just acquired from the Baptist, 1:35-42) suggests that Jesus himself had turned elements behind the early Johannine tradition from the Baptist's Nazirite renunciation of wine.
The story of Samson, the nazirite, suggests that hair was regarded as having a special force or vitality.