Nazis


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Related to Nazis: holocaust, World War 2

Nazis

(National Socialism) spread fear and terror throughout Hitler’s Germany. [Ger. Hist.: NCE, 1894]
References in periodicals archive ?
London, Jan 28 (ANI): Apple has announced that it has removed a Nazi Party anthem from the German version of its iTunes online music store after it was revealed that it sold songs and albums of neo-Nazi bands.
If I thought there was any link between the BNP and Nazis, I would resign tomorrow," said Mr Newman, who is standing in Redditch's Greenlands ward.
In the late 1970s, at the height of the debate over the origins of the "Final Solution," Martin Broszat and other functionalists interpreted anti-Semitic propaganda as a tool of Nazi leaders to bind together the party faithful.
Reactions to Wolfenstein's latest "No More Nazis" tweet for Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus has been overwhelmingly supportive, with any pro-Nazi sympathizers being ridiculed for even playing a game that has encouraged players to kill Nazis for decades.
We recognize that AP should have done some things differently during this period, for example protesting when AP photos were exploited by the Nazis for propaganda within Germany and refusing to employ German photographers with active political affiliations and loyalties," the report said.
The Telegraph reported the story, first published in Germany's Bild, of how the photographer, knowing full well that the child pictured was Jewish, entered the photograph into the contest "to make the Nazis ridiculous.
He notes that the Nazis had to balance the "Normative State" with the "Prerogative State" to ensure social order in the long ran.
This fracas reminded me of a story told me by my late Uncle Hugh, an avid Aston Villa supporter, who watched Villa all over the country in the 1930s, about when Villa defied Hitler and Nazi Germany.
Goebbels used sophisticated media techniques to create a brand that reached out to every speaker of German, validating every angry suspicion about those who were not German or "Aryan," reinforcing every positive belief Germans held about themselves and their nation and tying it all to one man and one party, Hitler and the Nazis.
The poll also showed that 61 per cent of Austrian adults wanted to see a "strong man" in charge of government, and 54 per cent said they thought it would be "highly likely" that the Nazis would win seats in they were allowed to take part in an election.
Herf illustrates in great detail and with telling quotes of this propaganda material how the Nazis spared no efforts to incite the Islamic world against the Jews and the allied countries of America, England, and the Soviet Union.
We - and I hope it's a lot of us - have a right to say we don't like it, that we don't agree with hatred and symbols of the Nazis.