meningism

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meningism

[mə′nin‚jiz·əm]
(medicine)
A condition in which signs and symptoms suggest meningitis, but clinical evidence for the disease is absent. Also known as meningismus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Therefore, we analyzed the frequency of neck stiffness, reduced GCS score, and seizures among febrile patients with clinical CNS infection (Table 1).
Meningeal syndrome (meningitis or meningo-encephalitis) was defined as onset of illness of more than one week; low grade fever, headache, vomiting, confusion, seizures, altered level of consciousness, neck stiffness, hemiparesis and cranial nerve palsies.
Patients who undergo intraspinal surgery should be counselled on potential postoperative symptoms, such as dizziness, neck stiffness, and postural headache, as these may be indicators of IH.
The pain was frontal and midline and soon followed by dizziness, neck stiffness, nausea, vomiting, and tingling in the fingers of both hands.
Sam The Blues flanker will miss tonight's Challenge Cup clash with Pau in Cardiff due to neck stiffness, leaving him short of match fitness ahead of captaining Wales against Australia on November 5.
"These develop rapidly in older children and adults and usually include a headache, neck stiffness, nausea and high fever, with or without the telltale rash which doesn't fade when a glass is rolled over it.
8 (57.1%) patients had fever, 3 (21.4%) patients had neck stiffness. 1 (7.1%) patient had hepatosplenomegaly and 5 (35.7%) patients had a loss of weight.
If untreated, symptoms may include loss of the ability to move one or both sides of the face, joint pains, severe headaches with neck stiffness, or heart palpitations among others.
Symptoms include fever, headaches, sensitivity to bright light, neck stiffness and a rash which doesn't vanish when pressed with a clear glass.
A 52-year-old man presented to our Emergency Department with a 2- to 3-day history of sore throat, neck stiffness, and swollen glands.
Potential predictors of abnormal CSF were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses, namely headache, confusion, terminal neck stiffness, photophobia, focal neurological signs, seizures, HIV status and [CD4.sup.+] cell count.
Neck stiffness and signs of meningeal irritation, Kerning's sign and Brudzincski's sign, were present in 53 (27.60%) patients; 26 (13.54%); and 18 (9.3%) respectively.