nit

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nit

1
1. the egg of a louse, usually adhering to human hair
2. the larva of a louse or similar insect

nit

2
a unit of luminance equal to 1 candela per square metre

nit

3 a unit of information equal to 1.44 bits

Nit

 

the name of a unit of luminance previously included in the International System of Units (SI). The unit is equal to 1 (candle/m2). It was accepted by the International Commission on Illumination in 1951 and by the All-Union State Standard (GOST) 7932–56 on light units but was not approved by the General Conference on Weights and Measures. The international symbol is nt; 1 nt = 10-4 candle/cm2 = 9.95 × 10-5 stilb = 3.13 × 10-4 lambert. The term “nit” is not included in new standards of units.

nit

[nit]
(communications)
A unit of information content such that the information content of a symbol or message in nits is the negative of the natural logarithm of the probability of selecting that symbol or message from all the symbols or messages which could have been chosen. Also known as nepit.
(optics)
A unit of luminance, equal to 1 candela per square meter. Abbreviated nt.

nit

A unit of luminance equal to 1 candela per square meter. Abbr. nt.

nit

A measurement of the brightness of light. One nit is equal to one candela (one candlepower) per square meter (1cd/m2). The sun at noon is rated at 1.6 billion nits. Although, LCD screens range from 200 to 500 nits, our outdated TV standard is 100 nits, which was set in the days when rare earth phosphors were used in cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Various high dynamic range (HDR) technologies, such as Dolby Vision, yield 4,000 nits and above on LCD TVs. See Dolby HDR and LED TV.

Nit ratings are not commonly advertised; however, in 2014, Lenovo published them for its W540 ThinkPad laptop. One model had a common 1920x1080 resolution at 220 nits, and another had a high-resolution 2880x1620 screen at 300 nits. See stilb and candela.
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, Murray Rothbard--a hard-core libertarian if there ever was one--argued that "it is difficult to consider [Friedman] a free-market economist at all," and a prominent item on his bill of particulars was precisely the negative income tax idea.
By substituting income from this negative income tax for welfare, the NCBS has enabled poor families with children to exit provincial welfare at a lower level of earnings.
The fact is that those on the bottom half of the income ladder have earned a year's worth of federal income taxes before January runs out and many of those on the lower rungs who have children and apply for the negative income tax do not work a minute to pay income taxes.
Any EIC in excess of total tax liability is refundable and the refundable portion is included in the transfer payments component of personal income rather than as a negative income tax in the payments series.
For example, if one's earnings fell $100 below the designated minimum income line and the negative income tax rate were 50 percent, one would have a negative tax payment--a subsidy--of $50.
Proposals include British writer and politician Lady Juliet Rhys-Williams's credit income tax in the 1940s; conservative economist Milton Friedman's negative income tax in the 1960s; liberal economists James Tobin, Paul Samuelson and John Kenneth Galbraith's 1968 call for a guaranteed income; and British economist James Meade's citizen's income.
Among conservatives there is now much more suspicion of the welfare state and little support for a negative income tax.
Calhoun and James Madison and extends through Milton Friedman's recommendation for a negative income tax.
5 billion for a negative income tax would keep federal tax rates flat for the 40 percent of U.
In this collection of 18 articles contributors describe the history, debates, evidence and proposals inherent in a basic income guarantee, including such topics as the shadow of the old Poor Law, early American views on inheritance and equal shares, the guaranteed income movement of the 1960s and 1970s, negative income tax experiments, the perspective of US domestic policy, the concepts of liberal neutrality and work, exploitation, efficiency, welfare reform, back-to-work programs in France, social minima in Europe, and reports of experiences with basic income guarantees in South Africa, Brazil, Belgium.