négritude

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négritude

(nĕg`rĭto͞od', –tyo͞od), a literary movement on the part of French-speaking African and Caribbean writers who lived in Paris during the 1930s, 40s, and 50s. Adherents of négritude included Leopold Sédar SenghorSenghor, Léopold Sédar
, 1906–2001, African statesman and poet; president (1960–80) of the Republic of Senegal, b. Joal. The son of a prosperous landowner, Senghor was extraordinarily gifted in literature and won a scholarship to study at the Sorbonne
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, Léon DamasDamas, Léon
(Léon-Gentran Damas), 1912–78, French poet, b. French Guiana. With Léopold Senghor and Aimé Césaire he was one of the first adherents of négritude, a cultural movement emphasizing black consciousness.
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, and Aimé CésaireCésaire, Aimé
(Aimé Fernand Césaire) , 1913–2008, West Indian poet and essayist who wrote in French. After studying in Paris he became concerned with the plight of blacks in what he considered a decadent Western society.
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, who is said to have coined the term. Characteristic of négritude are a denunciation of Europe's devastation of Africa, a decrying of the coldness and stiffness of Western culture and its lack of the humane qualities found in African cultures, and an assertion of the glories and truths of African history, beliefs, and traditions.

negritude

a cultural and political movement started in the 1930s to encourage the development of pride and dignity in the heritage of black peoples by rediscovering ancient African values and modes of thought. The movement was originally concerned with an artistic and cultural critique of Western societies, but was broadened into a more political programme under the influence of Leopold Senghor (poet and president of Senegal). Negritude was an attempt to raise the consciousness of blacks throughout the world. Compare BLACK POWER MOVEMENT, EQUAL RIGHTS MOVEMENT, BLACK MUSLIMS, RASTAFARIAN.
References in periodicals archive ?
En second lieu, concernant les Noirs francophones qui constitueront la generation de la Negritude, quelques poemes seulement d'Aime Cesaire et de Leopold Senghor sont publies a la veille de la seconde guerre mondiale, assez paradoxalement par la revue Volontes, d'orientation plutot favorable au national-socialisme et de diffusion assez confidentielle.
CA: First of all, the notion of Negritude was quite intoxicating when it was first propounded because of the times.
By declining to romanticize Segu in all its glory or victimize it in its collapse, Conde departs from her earlier male Negritude models.
Cesaire later turned to the theater, discarding Negritude for black militancy.
Neste canto, cujo autor e desconhecido, o primeiro dado trata-se da afirmacao da negritude.
It becomes clear in Walsh's analysis that for Cesaire both Toussaint and Christophe function as historical embodiments of the tragic vision of negritude, which he relates to Cesaire's political trajectory.
The study of Negrismo and Negritude movements has gained momentum in the last two decades.
Leopold Senghor's concept of Negritude, perhaps, comes as close as anything but is an introduction that does not go far enough.
Voices of Negritude in Modernist Print: Aesthetic Subjectivity, Diaspora, and the Lyric Regime.
Indeed, a central distinctive attribute in African literature was the Negritude movement which came into existence as a result of the European colonization.
Corzani defines it as a movement that tends to valorize "la culture indienne (originaire de l'Inde) aux Antilles sur le modele de la negritude et parfois en reaction contre cette derniere" (1436).