Nemacolin's Path


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Nemacolin's Path

(nĕm`əkō'lĭnz), Native American trail between the Potomac and the Monongahela rivers, going from the site of Cumberland, Md., to the mouth of Redstone Creek, where Brownsville, Pa., is situated. It was blazed and cleared in 1749 or 1750 by Nemacolin, a Delaware chief, and Thomas Cresap, a Maryland frontiersman. The path was of military importance as the route of George Washington's first Western expedition and of Gen. Edward BraddockBraddock, Edward,
1695–1755, British general in the French and Indian War (see under French and Indian Wars). Although he had seen little active campaigning before 1754, Braddock was reputed to have a good knowledge of European military tactics and was noted as a stern
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's expedition in the last of the French and Indian WarsFrench and Indian Wars,
1689–1763, the name given by American historians to the North American colonial wars between Great Britain and France in the late 17th and the 18th cent.
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. It was known as Braddock's Road until the Cumberland Road or National RoadNational Road,
U.S. highway built in the early 19th cent. At the time of its construction, the National Road was the most ambitious road-building project ever undertaken in the United States. It finally extended from Cumberland, Md., to St.
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 was built on the same route.
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