Nemea

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Nemea

(nē`mēə, nĭmē`ə), city of ancient Greece, in N Argolis. At the temple of Zeus were held the Nemean games, which from 573 B.C. were one of the four Panhellenic festivals; the games were held in the second and fourth years of each Olympiad. Of Pindar's odes, 11 celebrate Nemean victories. The temple and palaestra have been excavated. Nemea is also the name of a river that formed the boundary of Corinth and Sicyon (near modern Sikión).
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Nemea

(in ancient Greece) a valley in N Argolis in the NE Peloponnese; site of the Nemean Games, a Panhellenic festival and athletic competition held every other year
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Among the events that the book narrates are the Argives end their drought, Polyxo incites the Lemnian women, Hypsipyle's pious act, the Nemean serpent, and the death of the baby Opheltes.
Even Hippomedon's Nemean horse is terrified of it (4.137).
In it, Hercules battles the multiheaded Lernaean hydra water monster, the behemoth Erymanthian boar and the massive Nemean lion.
One of the most popular of myths is that of Herakles slaying the Nemean lion, the first of the demigod's 12 labors.
(Aslan, by the way, is Turkish for "lion.") But the ancient Greeks usually connected Leo with the Nemean Lion.
As Catherine Belsey observes, "a father who urges his son to commit high treason, even against a murderer, might not be thought to have the son's long term interests at heart"; (57) and, tellingly, Hamlet imagines himself at first playing the Nemean lion's part to the Ghost's Hercules (1.4.83).
(28) Herakles is often depicted in his famous lion skin, taken from the Nemean Lion: his first labor, performed in penance after he slaughtered his entire family in an act of savage, insane brutality.
He argues that just as the lyric poet Pindar used the ode Nemean 8 to express his anxiety about the "use of rhetoric to gain fame and fortune" (p.
Given the magnitude of his labors - killing the Nemean lion, cleaning the Augean stables, fetching the golden apples of the Hesperides, and the list goes on - you can't blame Herakles for being weary.
One day it rained and thundered on the Nemean forest, for which until then they had cared, and in which were hidden Vico's "giants," all astonishment and ferocity (The New Science [377] 117).