Nemean Games


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Related to Nemean Games: Olympic Games, Pythian Games, Isthmian Games

Nemean Games

 

in ancient Greece, competitions held in the valley of Nemea in Argolis (Peloponnesos) at the temple of Zeus. According to legend, the Nemean Games were established either by Adrastus, the leader of the campaign of the Seven Against Thebes, or by Heracles. In recorded history, the Nemean Games have been known since 573 B.C. They were held every second June, during the new moon, and included competitions in sports and music. The games were initially organized by the citizens of the city of Cleonae, but after 460 B.C. the citizens of Argos ran them. Wreaths of olive branches or of celery were awarded the victors. The Nemean Games ended in the late fourth century A.D. after the adoption of Christianity as the state religion.

Nemean Games

Probably August
Ancient Greek games, one of four ancient Greek festivals involving games, held every second year in the sanctuary of Zeus in the valley of Nemea in the northeastern part of the Greek Peloponnesus. Little is known of these games before 573 b.c.e. Legend says they may have been originated by Hercules after he slew the lion of Nemea—one of his 12 labors. He killed the lion by driving it into a cave and strangling it. The games consisted of gymnastic, equestrian, and musical contests. Winners were crowned with a garland of wild celery.
See also Isthmian Games; Pythian Games; and Olympic Games
SOURCES:
ClassDict-1984, p. 399
GdAnctWrld-1986, p. 427
OxClassDict-1970, p. 726
References in periodicals archive ?
13 were performed during the hard fighting posterior to these events, and that the festivities meant to honour Pytheas did not take place very long after his Nemean victory,(61) both odes--taking into account that the Nemean Games were organized in summer (July?
In Bacchylides 13 Heracles' battle with the Nemean lion is linked explicitly both to the institution of the Nemean games and to the development of civilization.