Neo-Classicism


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Neo-Classicism

(1900–1920)
A revival stylebased primarily on Greek and to a lesser extent on Roman orders, producing symmetrically arranged buildings of monumental proportions. Colossal pedimented porticos were flanked by a series of pilasters. The arch was not used, and enriched moldings are rare. The preference was for simple geometric forms and smooth surfaces. The design was based on the assembly of separate volumes, each dedicated to a single function.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
It is only possible to claim that the scheme of the musical structure refers to the then topical neo-Baroque tendencies representing an avant-garde trend, which is (not only in Czech musicology) incorporated under the not quite apposite term "Neo-Classicism" with reference to the activities of Les Six, Igor Stravinsky and the composers of the Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity) movement.
In contrast to Neo-Classicism, Baroque art and architecture seemed grotesque, excessive and out of control.
As she moves into the problematic period between Renaissance and Neo-Classicism, Beam covers a broad range of topics.
She argues persuasively that these phases of emergence and suppression can only be understood by situating them within the broader cultural, especially literary, shifts in Italy during this period: early humanism, Bembo's vernacular humanism, a more theoretical and argumentative neo-classicism, the baroque, and finally the Arcadian movement around 1700.
The villas and palaces he designed for the aristocrats of Venice, as well as his Four Books Of Architecture, defined an architectural style that became known as neo-classicism.
AEsthetically, too, these trends are reflected in the writings of the period, which, as subtly indicated by Michel Brix, represent not so much a break between Romanticism and Neo-Classicism, but an evolution from the Neo-Platonism of Mme de Stael and Victor Cousin to a belief in art as an expression of the passions, with no claim to absolute Truth, as exemplified by Stendhal (Patrizia Lombardo's essay is particularly helpful in this connection) and Balzac.
128); the theme is central to Dominique Bertrand's recent work on laughter in French neo-classicism (Dire le rire a l'age classique (Aix-en-Provence: University de Provence, 1995)), which is curiously absent from the volume.
At New York City Ballet, she and Peter Martins epitomized the coolest, loftiest principles of neo-classicism (think the pure whiteness of Balanchine's Chaconne).
Cellist Kate Gould explained that it had some neo-classicism, some Russian chant, harmonic dissonance alongside conventional harmony - and some echoes of Shostakovich.
In between there are six chapters on the Italian renaissance, the renaissance in northern Europe, the seventeenth century, 'rococo to neo-classicism', the birth or the modern world (the Romantics to the Pre-Raphaelites, Goya and Millais), impressionists and post-impressionists (Monet to Cezanne).