Neo-Grec


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Neo-Grec

A term descriptive of architecture, primarily in the 1870s, that sought to follow the trabeated, rectangular construction of the early Greeks (see Greek Revival); especially usually characterized by the use of brickwork and ironwork.
References in periodicals archive ?
Astor II in 1884 as a store, the Thomas Stent designed property has a Neo-Grec detailed facade spanning ten bays on Broadway, fourteen bays on Prince Street and ten bays on Crosby Street.
But in the Edwardian years, having worked for the Francophile classicist, Thomas Verity, he joined the avant-garde by developing an enthusiasm for a revived neoclassicism--what contemporaries called the neo-Grec.
Having earned the Grand Prix de Rome in 1824--his laurel wreath rests with reliquary stillness in a glass case alongside his box of drawing instruments, its lid decorated with signature Neo-Grec motifs--the twenty-three-year-old spent the next five years as a pensionnaire at the Villa Medici, scat of the French Academy in Rome.
The neo-Grec brownstone (built in 1883) at 20 Eighth Avenue, across the street from the Montauk Club between St.
On his own, Eidlitz became a much bolder architect as seen in his muscular designs for the Brooklyn Academy of Music (1860-1861) and the New York Produce Exchange (1860-1861), which show the influence of the Victorian Gothic and Neo-Grec, respectively.
IN HIS DEPICTION of subjects from classical myth and literature, Jean Lecomte du Nouy (1842-1923) followed the tenets of the neo-grec (new Greek) movement, whose pioneers included both Charles Gleyre and, most importantly, Jean Leon Gerome, one of its foremost exponents.
The fact that 'en neo-grec l'expression est normalement liee a Paques, comme terme technique pour le samedi avant Paques' does not explain how a Saturday four weeks before the earliest possible date for the celebration of Easter can be called a 'great sabbath'.
Sculptor Donald Judd owned, lived in, and worked in the neo-Grec SoHo cast iron building at 101 Spring Street for 26 years until his death in 1994.
The Spectacular Art of Jean-Leon Gerome' is the first major retrospective of the 19th-century French artist and traces his career from its neo-Grec beginnings in the studio of Paul Delaroche to later history paintings such as Pollice Verso (Thumbs Down) of a gladiatorial battle scene (1872).
He was, like any arriviste, keen to put his stamp on the externals while not worrying about what happened behind the neo-Grec columns and pilasters.
The property was building in 1854 and a cast-iron facade in neo-Grec style was later added to the first story.
But those in Southport, as designed in the sophisticated neo-Grec manner by Grayson and Barnish in the early 1920s, with sculpture by H.