Neo-Impressionism


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Related to Neo-Impressionism: divisionism, Post-impressionism

Neo-Impressionism

 

an art trend that originated around 1885 in France, where its principal representatives were G. Seurat and P. Signac. Neo-impressionism spread to Belgium (T. van Rysselberghe), Italy (G. Segantini), and other countries. In developing the principles of late impressionism, which was marked by an intensified interest in optic phenomena, the neo-impressionists sought to apply the latest discoveries in optics to art. They methodically broke down complex color tones into pure colors. Seeking to overcome the haphazard and fragmentary nature of impressionist compositions, the neo-impressionists resorted to decorative, two-dimensional compositional solutions. The cerebral method of neo-impressionism often led to the predominance of cold intellectualism and to a dry abstractness of images.

REFERENCES

Signac, P. Ot Ezh. Delakrua k neoimpressionizmu, Moscow, 1913.
Rewald, J. Postimpressionism. Leningrad-Moscow, 1962. (Translated from English.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Neo-impressionism. The neo-impressionists instituted a new form of impressionism based on two theories of color relationships presented by the French chemist Michel Eugene Chevreul: optical mixing, in which two juxtaposed colors can be seen to blend together to suggest a third, and simultaneous contrast, in which the perception of a particular hue is influenced by the ones that are placed next to it.
Diengott, working from a more specifically narratological point of view, characterizes feminist criticism of Austen as "decontextualizing, impressionistic writing that adheres to logic only when the critic feels like it" ("Neo-Impressionism" 46).
So with my skepticism about philosophy in general, I am either the most, or least, qualified artist I know to review University of Victoria art historian and anarchist Allan Antliff 's meticulously scholarly account of virtually every art movement (neo-impressionism, suprematism, constructivism) I've ever--well--loathed.
We're thinking that a tour of the Indianapolis Museum of Art, with its first-rate collection of neo-Impressionism, and the Eiteljorg, with the nation's largest collection of Western and Native American art, would make a fine outing.
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Arnold Bennett acknowledged this process when he testified to the consciousness-altering power of modern art in "Neo-Impressionism and Literature." The fact that his essay was first published on December 8, 1910, may have prompted Virginia Woolf to write the sentence that begins this essay and to expand upon it in "Mr.
In his seventies, Harwood again shifted his painting style, this time to Neo-Impressionism, a relaxed form of Pointillism.
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The international art market boomed more for macho neo-Impressionism than for feminist organic abstraction.
For the fractured political and artistic context is less a background than an informing dynamic, and one ultimately replicated in the evolving contradictions of Neo-Impressionism itself.
Alternating between oil and watercolor and gouache, and influenced a lot by neo-impressionism and abstract expressionism, she describes her paintings as 'lonely but hopeful, yet a little playful.
Goldfarb's early AbEx work, commendable as it is, took on a particularly personal thrust when her Tachisme eventually ceded place to the nervous dots of Neo-Impressionism, the "scientific method" of Georges Seurat and Paul Signac that reformulated the effect of light through the application of tiny points of pure color mixed, as it were, within the eye.