Neo-Rococo

Neo-Rococo

A style of architecture that reflects the transitional period from the Rococo to the Classical Revival style.
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Graham said: "I just want to dispel the myth that still exists to some extent, that Rockingham was all about over the top neo-rococo and applied bocage, all done in poor taste, the vast majority of which was produced in the Staffordshire factories.
From April 7 to 9, Riga's neo-baroque, neo-Rococo Splendid Palace will resound with jazz chords, improvisation, polyrhythms, syncopation, blue notes, and New and Old World harmonies as the world's finest young jazz artists descend on the Latvian capital to compete in Riga Jazz Stage 2016.
Asymmetrical curtain arrangements are appropriate to the Rococo or Neo-Rococo period.
During the Gilded Age, American industrialists such as Henry Clay Frick (aided by his dealer, Joseph Duveen) patronized the style to provide their residences with an opulent, old world veneer, And it should not be surprising--given the Rococo's long-standing association with market forces and consumerism--that the current neo-rococo upswing first emerged in the boom years of the late 1980s.
The current neo-rococo tendency, which emerged in the late '80s, may have originated like its eighteenth century forebear as a gesture of renunciation, sunbbing both the macho expressionism and cool Minimalism and Conceptualism of the previous two decades.
Not all neo-rococo works invoke eighteenth-century subject matter or visible stylistic traits.
This seamlessness was helped along by the decision to omit the two city-specific tendencies that have dominated American painting of late: neo-rococo portraiture from New York, as practiced by John Currin, Lisa Yuskavage, Elizabeth Peyton, Kurt Kauper, et al.
To be sure, Koons is not alone here--both Barbara Bloom and Cindy Sherman have had their neo-Rococo moments.