Neoclassical

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Related to Neo-classic: baroque, Neoclassical architecture

Neoclassical

Refers to a rebirth of classicism in the architecture of Europe and America during the late 18th and 19th centuries. Characterized by the widespread use of Greek and Roman architectural orders and decorative motifs, strong geometric compositions, and shallow relief in ornamental detail.
References in periodicals archive ?
Born in Durham, 1751, Sheraton was an artist and a neo-classic English furniture designer.
I then became lost in the Faro Municipal Museum, which appears quite plain from the outside but inside reveals a wealth of history from the Islamic House to the Roman Mosaic Room and to a fantastic display of 16th to 19th century paintings in the Renaissance to Neo-classic styles.
Bryon Ruesselet, an architectural conservator with Evergreene Painting Studio of New York City (show here), recently uncovered a mural of neo-classic motifs, with Roman figures and decorative elements, under layers of paint on the theater's ceiling.
Many believe the stately, tree-lined Lange Voorhout, with neo-classic, gothic and baroque style buildings, is one of the most beautiful spots in The Hague.
This was replaced in 1831 with a Neo-Classic theatre on a site opposite the beautiful city hall.
MAGNIFICENT NEO-CLASSIC VILLA and guest pavilion meticulously renovated, offering the utmost in uncompromising elegant design, unsurpassed quality and attention to detail.
As he says, the story ``repudiates the assumption, implicit in Greek, Elizabethan and neo-classic drama that suffering is the sombre privilege of those in high places.
Apparently, his compositional tastes have grown from neo-classic style (Although he dislikes the label.
The grant has also ensured that this fine Grade II neo-classic style building has been preserved and continues to form an important visual contribution to Merthyr Tydfil's town centre.
Castillo-Feliu, identifies its style as "late neo-classic narrative" (viii), it would be useful to consider some romantic aspects in this historical novel, which coexist with its neoclassic elements.
Typical of the favoured architectural style are the stuccoed facades and neo-classic porticoed porches plus tidy front steps and masses of decorative wrought ironwork - all features of Clarence Mansions.
Equal parts screwball comedy and neo-classic Greek tragedy, "Fallen Arches" is yet another riff on the mob.