Neo-Impressionism

(redirected from Neo-impressionist)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Neo-impressionist: divisionism, Post-impressionism

Neo-Impressionism

 

an art trend that originated around 1885 in France, where its principal representatives were G. Seurat and P. Signac. Neo-impressionism spread to Belgium (T. van Rysselberghe), Italy (G. Segantini), and other countries. In developing the principles of late impressionism, which was marked by an intensified interest in optic phenomena, the neo-impressionists sought to apply the latest discoveries in optics to art. They methodically broke down complex color tones into pure colors. Seeking to overcome the haphazard and fragmentary nature of impressionist compositions, the neo-impressionists resorted to decorative, two-dimensional compositional solutions. The cerebral method of neo-impressionism often led to the predominance of cold intellectualism and to a dry abstractness of images.

REFERENCES

Signac, P. Ot Ezh. Delakrua k neoimpressionizmu, Moscow, 1913.
Rewald, J. Postimpressionism. Leningrad-Moscow, 1962. (Translated from English.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The 6th Symphony is generally considered an extraordinary achievement, the Frescos of Pierro della Francesca are in the same, Neo-impressionist vein, and the three-part suite recalling some key orchestral passages from Julietta (in the arrangement by Zbynek Vostrak) apploaches his late symphonies and equals them in intensity of beauty.
PARIS, March 24 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- From 15 March to 10 July 2005, the Musee d'Orsay is showing 120 neo-impressionist paintings as part of its major exhibition entitled "Neo-Impressionism: from Seurat to Paul Klee".
Herbert and others, is encyclopedic in the detail it devotes to Seurat and the emergence of the Neo-Impressionist movement.
When he first arrived in Collioure in 1905, Matisse had been working in the neo-impressionist manner of Seurat, experimenting with small touches of pure pigment in a regular arrangement.
A native Chicago neo-impressionist, whose works hang in museums and galleries worldwide, his original paintings have been included in the private collections of presidents Bill Clinton, George Bush Sr.
Her interest in modern painting drew her to the leading Symbolist, Neo-Impressionist, and Cubist painters of the period.
Taken with the composition of the canvases--in which monochrome bands emanate like the rays of the sun from two distinctly discordant vanishing points--the color choices called to mind neo-Impressionist methods that plumbed the "inherent" emotional values of line and color.
The exhibition begins with some splendid neo-impressionist portraits of what Hawthorne called "earth's undecaying monuments.
A leader in the Neo-Impressionist brotherhood, Signac (1863-1935) is probably best known for his oil landscapes and his marine canvasses.
Armed with this experience and information, the Neo-Impressionist paintings at the art museum, with their pure color dots, made quite an impact on my students.
The name Seurat comes from the French Neo-Impressionist painter Georges Seurat, who was known for a unique painting style called "pointillism.