Neo-Impressionism

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Related to Neo-impressionist: divisionism, Post-impressionism

Neo-Impressionism

 

an art trend that originated around 1885 in France, where its principal representatives were G. Seurat and P. Signac. Neo-impressionism spread to Belgium (T. van Rysselberghe), Italy (G. Segantini), and other countries. In developing the principles of late impressionism, which was marked by an intensified interest in optic phenomena, the neo-impressionists sought to apply the latest discoveries in optics to art. They methodically broke down complex color tones into pure colors. Seeking to overcome the haphazard and fragmentary nature of impressionist compositions, the neo-impressionists resorted to decorative, two-dimensional compositional solutions. The cerebral method of neo-impressionism often led to the predominance of cold intellectualism and to a dry abstractness of images.

REFERENCES

Signac, P. Ot Ezh. Delakrua k neoimpressionizmu, Moscow, 1913.
Rewald, J. Postimpressionism. Leningrad-Moscow, 1962. (Translated from English.)
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the early 20th-century art historian Nikolai Punin made the perceptive distinction that despite any visual similarities, Neo-Impressionist artists still attempt to represent the world of physical reality, whereas a Byzantine icon is conversely a presentation of a spiritual reality.
Digital artists can render a still life with pointillism as a Neo-impressionist might, or craft a rough and rocky landscape in dry brushed watercolor or thickly textured impasto.
Dooley-Marek is a Canadian (Toronto area) who paints in a neo-impressionist style.
Cross, who is sometimes identified as a neo-Impressionist, was a friend of Signac, the better known pointillist master.
Pissarro, meanwhile, renewed himself from the late 1880s onward by being receptive to the neo-Impressionist style known as pointillism, as practiced by the younger Georges Seurat.
The 6th Symphony is generally considered an extraordinary achievement, the Frescos of Pierro della Francesca are in the same, Neo-impressionist vein, and the three-part suite recalling some key orchestral passages from Julietta (in the arrangement by Zbynek Vostrak) apploaches his late symphonies and equals them in intensity of beauty.
Herbert and others, is encyclopedic in the detail it devotes to Seurat and the emergence of the Neo-Impressionist movement.
Seurat: Drawings and Paintings reprints a selection of texts by the influential art historian Robert Herbert and represents almost half a century's worth of writing about the French Neo-Impressionist painter Georges Seurat (1859-1891).
THIS IS A STUDY of the thematics of idyll in the work of three French painters: the symbolist Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, the neo-impressionist Paul Signac, and the fauvist Henri Matisse.
When he first arrived in Collioure in 1905, Matisse had been working in the neo-impressionist manner of Seurat, experimenting with small touches of pure pigment in a regular arrangement.
Whether in the mythification of a golden past, the nostalgia for a community of artisans and craftsmen, or in the utopian idylls substituted for divisely Naturalist depictions of the peasantry, the Neo-Impressionist movement (after Seurat's death in 1891) looks as unconvincing as its efforts to reconcile a socially transformative art and the imperatives of the market.
The catalogue text by the fine painter/critic Stephen Westfall details Humphrey's technical evolution from the wood-supported, curve-shouldered, shieldlike, tonal symmetries of the '70s through his more cobbled and quirky neo-Impressionist, densely chromatic compositions of the following decade.