Neo-Baroque

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Neo-Baroque

Said of a mode of architecture (in the late 19th century and early 20th century) more or less patterned after Baroque architecture developed in the 17th century.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Metatheater and Modernity: Baroque and Neobaroque. Madison and Teaneck, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson UP.
Lezama's neobaroque style left a melancholic imprint in the early poetics of Flores and other writers, whereas Pinera's scathing and ironic style marked the poetics of Flores's last works.
It is Sarduy himself who in two of his best essays, Barroco and Nueva Inestabilidad, warns about the danger of setting up too superficial analogies between the cosmological decentering of baroque times and that caused by the Big Bang, which he calls neobaroque. The latter is revolutionary and does not regret losing the center.
Zamora notes that "under the sign of the Neobaroque, Latin American writers have engaged in the expressive forms of the historical Baroque to create a discourse of'counterconquest' [...] that operates widely in Latin America" (2006: xvi).
Despite its storied past and neobaroque architecture, the interior is ultramodern and Coruscant-like, boasting of an iconic steel and glass dome open to the public.
It is perhaps indicative of our neoBaroque era--the essential topos for which is the upside-down world--that our heroes have become monstrous.
1606); the monad of Deleuze's many-tiered high baroque Leibniz; neobaroque fingerprints: artistic authority, interpretation, and economic power/un-power of Finnegans Wake; and catastrophe, allegory, and the philosophical baroque: a quartet of Benjamin-Lacan and Joyce-Pynchon.
In Scotland, the Glasgow University campus is a largely self-contained neobaroque complex in the West End of the city.
CUBAN writer, Severo Sarduy, author of numerous essays, novels, books of poetry, and radio plays, remains even among Latinamericanists a relatively marginal writer; and this, I believe, is due to the inherent difficulty of his neobaroque, post-modern, fragmentary style.