Neo-Baroque

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Neo-Baroque

Said of a mode of architecture (in the late 19th century and early 20th century) more or less patterned after Baroque architecture developed in the 17th century.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite its storied past and neobaroque architecture, the interior is ultramodern and Coruscant-like, boasting of an iconic steel and glass dome open to the public.
It is perhaps indicative of our neoBaroque era--the essential topos for which is the upside-down world--that our heroes have become monstrous.
1606); the monad of Deleuze's many-tiered high baroque Leibniz; neobaroque fingerprints: artistic authority, interpretation, and economic power/un-power of Finnegans Wake; and catastrophe, allegory, and the philosophical baroque: a quartet of Benjamin-Lacan and Joyce-Pynchon.
In Scotland, the Glasgow University campus is a largely self-contained neobaroque complex in the West End of the city.
The Hanseatic city of Herford is planning the renovation and interior remodeling of properties located in the center of downtown neobaroque historic market hall.
theses in the field of Comparative Literature that address the issues in Borges's writing which include signs of culture within the limits of the Neobaroque paradigm: work, book, garden, library, outskirts ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), the question of aesthetics, and psychological identification in the literary work ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).
To highlight the centrality of time to the idioms of the Neobaroque, and more generally, to explore the capabilities that figurations of temporality hold out to Latin American aesthetics in its inexorable engagement with a history of brutality, we next turn to Julio Cortazar's stories "Apocalypse in Solentiname" and "Blow-Up," and to Fernando Boteros 1989 painting Comida campestre (The Picnic).
One of the first results of this study was a group of neobaroque dances for piano solo.
The superhero comic book may also be seen as a neobaroque medium, argues Arnaudo, in its visual and textual excesses, as well as its tendency to include citations of other comic books or media (for example, Arnaudo refers to the raising of the United Nations flag by DC superheroes in Battleground Earth, clearly refiguring Joe Rosenthal's landmark photograph of the flag-raising at Iwo Jima).
In each of the book's five chapters, the author chooses an example or pair of examples from baroque comedy and what has been termed twentieth-century neobaroque comedy, juxtaposing the works from the two periods and examining how and why metatheater functions similarly in each.
His research interests focus on queer theory and the neobaroque ethos.