Neoclassical


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Neoclassical

Refers to a rebirth of classicism in the architecture of Europe and America during the late 18th and 19th centuries. Characterized by the widespread use of Greek and Roman architectural orders and decorative motifs, strong geometric compositions, and shallow relief in ornamental detail.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another economist of the neoclassical variety, Francis Fukuyama, author of the best-selling book Trust, may have offended the sensibility of some pragmatic Americans and Filipinos who do not usually side with any doctrinaire political positions on economic issues.
It also allows the author to engage with criticisms previously leveled against the piece (and Stravinsky's neoclassical style) on their own terms.
Because of this, Murphy argues, neoclassical economists may side with Garrison's secular growth rather than Salerno's and Young's objection.
Neoclassical theory employs speech genres strategically so that the discourse used by authors appears as something other than it actually is.
'[T]he neoclassical tradition is structured around the theoretical problematic of reconciling the individual and the aggregate (collective, social, market) rationality.' (p.
They marginalized Keynesians and breathlessly re endorsed the old pre 1929 neoclassical" economics that exalted private enterprise and free markets as guarantors of prosperity.
It should come as no surprise that neoclassical, Keynesian, and Marxian economists all promote their respective theories as the most consistent with reality while dismissing alternative theories as inadequate.
Importantly, he notes that the neoclassical equilibrium framework depicts the conditions of equilibrium without explaining the market process that works toward equilibrium.
Neoclassical Realism: From Neorealism to Realist Foreign Policy Analysis
They argue that standard introductory presentations of neoclassical economics oversimplify their subject matter, deny the diversity of opinion that exists even within mainstream circles, and promotes a unidimensional worship of markets that is neither analytically justified nor appropriate in the real world.
Unless this neoclassical philosophy is severed from our current corporate governance practices, good governance will always falter no matter how many Sarbanes-Oxley reforms we attempt.