Neoclassical style

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Neoclassical style

An architectural style based primarily on the use of forms of Classical antiquity used in both public buildings and opulent homes; aspects of this style are imitative of the earlier Classical Revival style (often called Early Classical Revival) that was most popular from about 1770 to 1830; others are imitative of the Greek Revival style that was popular from about 1830 to 1850. Buildings in this style are generally characterized by: a smooth ashlar façade, an attic story, an enriched entablature, and a parapet; a symmetrical façade, commonly having a visually important full-width portico with full-height wood or stone classical columns or with square columns (sometimes paired) and full-height pilasters, or a one-story-high portico; an unadorned roof line; often a side-gabled roof, hipped roof, or gambrel roof; a moderate overhang at the eaves or boxed eaves; balustrades frequently located just above the eaves; commonly ornamented with statuary; a wide frieze below the cornice; double-hung, symmetrically arranged, with lintels above the windows; in homes, usually six-over-six or nine-over-nine double-hung windows; a doorway at the center of the façade, capped with a decorative lintel or with a broken pediment; ornamental elements usually surround the door. The terms Classical Revival, Neoclassical Revival, and Neoclassicism are sometimes used as synonyms for the Neoclassical style.
References in periodicals archive ?
Originally built in 1929, as a Masonic temple, the neoclassical architecture has been meticulously restored.
Pablo Bronstein's enticing, elaborately detailed ink, gouache, and pencil drawings make no apology for the machismo which, in the long-gone '80s, hideously spliced together retrograde postmodernism with Baroque and neoclassical architecture.
The third in the series shows us how Greek art flourished with the rise of Christianity as it explores the development of icon painting and the beginnings of neoclassical architecture.
The only blip in the evening was standing at the sandy bottom, trying to explain the pedestrianisation of the city centre, who John Baskerville was, and the rudiments of neoclassical architecture.
During the immediately following years, 1790 to about 1820, Berlin became a center of German romanticism, a landmark of neoclassical architecture, and, through the establishment of its university in 1810, the model for the modern research university.
Hundreds of guests -- from American customers to China's ambassador to the United Nations and other foreign dignitaries -- crammed The Haier Building's main floor for awards ceremonies, glimpses of neoclassical architecture, product displays and an elaborate buffet.
Then there's the example of neoclassical architecture.
Both literally and figuratively, Stanford White helped shape Twentieth Century America, establishing neoclassical architecture as the public architecture of the nation.
The neoclassical architecture of imperialism is about power without love and without prayer.
The first exhibition to examine the design evolution of Thomas Jefferson's Virginia home traces the chronological developments in a design and building program of one of the prime examples of neoclassical architecture in the U.
In the late 19th century, Ponce developed its own blend of Spanish Creole and neoclassical architecture called Ponce Creole; it's characterized by the use of Corinthian columns, wrought-iron balconies, and gas lamps.