Neoclassical style


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Neoclassical style

An architectural style based primarily on the use of forms of Classical antiquity used in both public buildings and opulent homes; aspects of this style are imitative of the earlier Classical Revival style (often called Early Classical Revival) that was most popular from about 1770 to 1830; others are imitative of the Greek Revival style that was popular from about 1830 to 1850. Buildings in this style are generally characterized by: a smooth ashlar façade, an attic story, an enriched entablature, and a parapet; a symmetrical façade, commonly having a visually important full-width portico with full-height wood or stone classical columns or with square columns (sometimes paired) and full-height pilasters, or a one-story-high portico; an unadorned roof line; often a side-gabled roof, hipped roof, or gambrel roof; a moderate overhang at the eaves or boxed eaves; balustrades frequently located just above the eaves; commonly ornamented with statuary; a wide frieze below the cornice; double-hung, symmetrically arranged, with lintels above the windows; in homes, usually six-over-six or nine-over-nine double-hung windows; a doorway at the center of the façade, capped with a decorative lintel or with a broken pediment; ornamental elements usually surround the door. The terms Classical Revival, Neoclassical Revival, and Neoclassicism are sometimes used as synonyms for the Neoclassical style.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It also allows the author to engage with criticisms previously leveled against the piece (and Stravinsky's neoclassical style) on their own terms.
(5) Mhatre's "statue" qualified as "art" in the dominant Anglo-centric view by adhering to the reigning neoclassical style.
The first was completed in 1808 by John Foster Senior in the Neoclassical style. This was replaced in the 1860s by a French Renaissance design by T H Wyatt.
The following year, in Rome, he painted The Oath of the Horatii, a statement of his Republicanism and newly minted neoclassical style. Christ, with echoes of Rubens, Caravaggio, and Reni, is shown against a night sky with just enough light left to pick out a capriccio of ancient Rome behind him with the Colosseum and the Pyramid of Cestius prominent.
Couples can relax in one of 146 luxurious rooms that are decorated in a neoclassical style with a combination of avant-garde and classic furniture, and a comfortable bed that is covered in 300-thread count cotton sheets.
The main part of the current structure, in a neoclassical style, was built in the early 19th century after its predecessor was destroyed in a fire.
The company has never been to Russia, but their neoclassical style is very close to Russian ballet.
The early 19th Century hall, built in the neoclassical style, lends itself perfectly to exhibitions, being unfurnished but with big windows which admit a lot of natural light.
This piece, inspired by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's epic poem "The Song of Hiawatha," is remarkable in both its break from Lewis' Neoclassical style and its sensitive and dignified treatment of Native Americans.
Bonvilles Court is in neoclassical style and has plenty of living space.
Construction of the building began in 1913 by Chicago-based Architect Charles Draper Faulkner, working in the Neoclassical style. Despite being converted to office space in 2005, original details remain throughout the building, including Doric columns, cathedral ceilings and open space.