Delaware Prophet

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Delaware Prophet

(dĕl`əwâr, –wər), fl. 18th cent., Native American leader. His real name is not known. He began preaching (c.1762) among the Delaware of the Muskingum valley in Ohio. He spoke against intertribal war, drunkenness, polygamy, and the use of magic, and he promised his hearers that if they would but heed his words the Native Americans would be strong again and able to resist the whites. He prepared symbolic charts of his message on deerskin and left them in various villages to help his converts teach others. The religious fervor spread rapidly and is said to have been an inspiration to Pontiac. After the collapse of Pontiac's Rebellion (1763–66) the cult of the Delaware Prophet waned and was largely superseded by that of the Munsee Prophet, who was in turn succeeded by the Shawnee Prophet.
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Contract awarded for 2018 yeongtong-gu neolin park landscape facilities maintenance (contract for unit price)
Using the teachings of the Indian prophet Neolin to inspire his listeners, Pontiac convinced a group of Ottawas, Chippewas, Potawatomis, and Hurons to join him in an attempt to seize Fort Detroit.
Southey based the character of Neolin on factual accounts of the Delaware shaman of the same name and Fulford makes the remarkable claim that Southey's poetic innovation in form and tone were a direct result of his awareness of this Native American prophet before going on to suggest that these innovations shaped the Romantic movement in Britain.
It is not surprising that Neolin, Tenskwatawa, and Handsome Lake, much as they differed on other matters, agreed that hell was the eternal abode of the greedy.
This interpretation often gave rise to nativistic religious movements such as those associated with the Shawnee prophet Tenskwatawa and the Delaware holy man Neolin.
Nativism's Bastard: Neolin, Tenskwatawa, and the Anishinabeg Methodist Movement" In Karl S.
For instance, he argues that Pontiac's War, inspired by the Delaware prophet Neolin, was more than just a united Indian movement to stop white settlement in the west.
The first frames the sixty-year conflict that consumed the Native Americans, and the second illuminates the story's spiritual side reflected in the revitalization tradition represented by Neolin and other prophets.
Among the most influential was Neolin "the Enlightened," a Delaware who rejected servile acceptance of English rule and preached resistance to the "dogs clothed in red.
In 1763, the Delaware prophet, Neolin, provided the inspiration for Pontiac's rebellion, and some fifty years later the Shawnee prophet, Tenskwatawa, provided the inspiration for Tecumseh's revolution.
a missing component will be suggested, namely Pontiac's embodiment of "sacred power"--that he did not simply manipulate the teachings of Delaware Prophet, Neolin, but was himself a "true believer.
During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, great prophets such as Neolin (Delaware), Handsome Lake (Seneca), Tenskwatawa (Shawnee), and Wovoka (Paiute) all prophesied about returning to traditional Indian ways, maintaining the spiritual relationships with the cosmos.