neoplasia

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Related to Neoplasias: neoplastic, Neoplastic tissue

neoplasia

[‚nē·ə′plā·zhə]
(medicine)
Formation of a neoplasm or tumor.
Formation of new tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
2% prevalence of AIN in women with intraepithelial neoplasia of the cervix, vulva, or vagina was observed in another study.
ABSTRACT Disseminated neoplasia in cultured Mytilus chilensis (Mytilidae) from the Beagle Channel (Tierra del Fuego Province) in southern Argentina has been detected for the first time.
Thus, the incidence of neoplasia among women with postmenopausal bleeding was 25% (5 of 20) for those aged 50 and older vs.
En esta comunicacion se presentan algunos hallazgos obtenidos de pacientes caninas con neoplasias mamarias tratadas con tamoxifeno.
Early detection studies in a population with familial predisposition have shown by EUS and computed tomography (CT), in 15% of the cases, visible preinvasive lesions which are IPMN [5] and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) [6].
Since many of the genetic mutations associated with colorectal carcinogenesis are also associated with ulcerative colitis, researchers set out in this study to determine whether colitis-associated neoplasia (CAN) could be detected by applying a prototype panel of molecular markers to tissue samples taken from affected individuals.
Surface squamous neoplasia of the eye ranges from simple dysplasia to frank squamous cell carcinoma.
The effect was much more powerful when the analysis was restricted to those with longstanding extensive colitis; thiopurine exposure reduced the risk of new neoplasia by 72%--a 3.
When the researchers matched men from the VA Cooperative Study 380 with women in the present study who had a negative fecal occult blood test and no family history of colorectal cancer, flexible sigmoidoscopy had a significantly higher yield for advanced neoplasia in men (66%, 126 of 190) than in women (35%, 19 of 54).
As a result, they suggested that such lesions be termed lobular neoplasia rather than carcinoma in situ.
WASHINGTON -- Narrow-band imaging colonoscopy appears to offer no advantage over white-light colonoscopy in detecting colorectal neoplasia, according to clinical trial data presented at the annual Digestive Disease Week.