New Urbanism

(redirected from Neotraditionalism)
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New Urbanism

An approach to designing cities, towns, and neighborhoods that tries to reduce traffic and eliminate sprawl. Although the term New Urbanism emerged during the late 1980s and early 1990s, its principles are much older.
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With one part Norman Rockwell and two parts Disney, Neotraditionalism makes everything old, new again.
Shih has a good deal more to tell us about the varieties of Chinese responses to globalizing modernism, from the attraction of neotraditionalism to the erotic experimentalism of the Shanghai school.
More recently, in the second half of the twentieth century, the cultural politics became an even more complicated struggle between government sponsored Chinese neotraditionalism, Western or international modernism, and what Kuo, not pejoratively, calls "Taiwanese cultural nativism.
1999 [1994] Neotraditionalism in the Russian North.
The writers for the Advocate clearly assumed that their readers would be able to comprehend the parallels they invoked between Christian types of faith and Jewish neotraditionalism.
Some people consider the supposed outcomes of neotraditionalism to be too good to be true.
Ironically, the failure of past planning is the premise for the latest planning fad, variously called new urbanism, neotraditionalism, or smart growth.
Key characteristics or values: neotraditionalism, ritual, optimism, technological adeptness, compartmentalized work and life
Most important, Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Peter Calthorpe, and Tony Nellessen - all committed to the new urbanism, or neotraditionalism, as it is often called - have publicized their efforts to wide audiences and encouraged a younger generation of planners and designers to take up their design principles.
Langdon fears that builders will take the wrong cues from neotraditionalism, adding porches and period decoration to houses "in subdivisions riddled with all of the defects of conventional community design.
Neither developmentalism nor neotraditionalism is exclusive to the Middle East, but each assumes a local form there.
Rather than presenting the actual views of the partisans in that polarized debate, the editors have chosen to summarize the arguments for and against New Urbanism, neotraditionalism and green building in their introduction to this section.