Nephrolepis


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Related to Nephrolepis: Nephrolepis exaltata

Nephrolepis

 

a genus of epiphytic or terrestrial ferns of the family Oleandraceae (sometimes assigned to the family Davalliaceae). The shortened stems of Nephrolepis yield thin horizontal shoots, on which new frond rosettes develop. The fronds are compound pinnate; they retain apical growth for several years, attaining a length of 3 m or more (for example, Nephrolepis biserrata and N. cordifolia). The sori are located at the margin and are equipped with reniform indusia. There are about 30 species in the tropics of both hemispheres. Some species, including N. exaltat and N. acuminata and their numerous ornamental forms, are raised indoors.

References in periodicals archive ?
Datos sobre la pteridoflora subespontanea iberica: Cyrtomium falcatum (Dryopteridaceae) y Nephrolepis cordifolia (Nephrolepidaceae).
Nephrolepis exaltata (Nephrolepidaceae), naturalized in Europe.
Unique Characteristics: Stems are 24-28 inches long; plant is similar to Nephrolepis but has longer and wider leaves, often containing spores beneath.
Family Name (Latin and Common): Polypodiaceae, the Polypody family ketated Family Members in Book: Adiantum, Nephrolepis, Platycerium, Polystichum, and Rumohra
The specimens were collected in Cariblanco on Nephrolepis cordifolia (Oleandraceae) and in Coronado on Blechnum schiedeanum (Blechnaceae).
semicordata guardan mayor grado de similitud con los presentes en los gametofitos descritos para los helechos Dryopteridaceos y las especies estudiadas de Nephrolepis.
En cuanto a la expresion sexual, los gametofitos estudiados fueron monoicos y protandricos situacion presente en algunas especies de Nephrolepis (Nauman 1989), sin embargo este caracter es variable dentro de los helechos Tectariaceos y Dryopteridaceos.
Martens & Galeotti DAVALLIACEAE (1/1) Nephrolepis undulata Hr BMM 1321 (Afzel.
Link B G, E h DAVALLIACEAE Nephrolepis multiflora (Roxb.
Measurements of the mitotic index, cell division cycles, and nuclear DNA for different shoot apical zones of Ceratopteris, Azolla, and Nephrolepis indicate that the shoot apical cell in these species divides as frequently as or more actively than subjacent cells (Gifford et al.