Neptune's rings

Neptune's rings

Four dark planetary rings around Neptune, discovered in 1976 during close observation of an occultation of a star by Neptune and confirmed during the Voyager 2 flyby in 1989 (see table). The Adams and Le Verrier rings are quite thin. The Adams ring has several brighter arcs of material, first observed from Earth. Two broad rings, Galle and Plateau, are diffuse sheets of fine particles. The Plateau has a brighter edge at a distance of about 57 500 km from the planet.
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Neptune's rings clump together into arcs while the ones around Uranus possibly reach down into its atmosphere.
Mark Showalter, from the SETI Institute, discovered the Moon in a series of images of Neptune's rings, notes the NASA release.
Neptune's Rings "On May loth of last year, a handful of widely scattered observing teams witnessed an occultation by Neptune; as it turned out, two weeks later another occultation by the same planet was observed from Cerro Tololo in Chile.
From afar, Neptune's rings look like partial "ring arcs," seemingly interrupted in places as they circled the planet.
Only Neptune's rings have been previously observed to have persistent arcs, and there also a resonance is probably responsible for preventing particles from spreading around the ring's circumference.
Beginning in 1980, Neptune's rings were detected by ground-based and airborne telescopic observations of stellar occultations.