Nereid


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Nereid

(nĭr`ēəd), in astronomy, one of the eight known moons, or natural satellites, of NeptuneNeptune,
in astronomy, 8th planet from the sun at a mean distance of about 2.8 billion mi (4.5 billion km) with an orbit lying between those of Uranus and the dwarf planet Pluto; its period of revolution is about 165 years.
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Nereid

(neer -ee-id) A small satellite of Neptune with a highly eccentric 360-day orbit that takes it between 1.3 and 9.6 million km from the planet. It was discovered in 1949 by G.P. Kuiper. Nereid is about 340 km in diameter, Voyager 2's best photographs of it were taken from a distance of nearly 5 million km and show that it has an albedo of about 0.14. See Table 2, backmatter.

Nereid

 

a satellite of the planet Neptune. Nereid has a diameter of 300 km, and its mean distance from the center of the planet is 5,570,000 km. It was discovered in 1949 by the American astronomer G. P. Kuiper. Nereid is the only planetary satellite in the solar system that has an extremely elongated orbit (eccentricity 0.75). It was named after the Nereids, sea nymphs of Greek mythology.

Nereid

[′nir·ē·əd]
(astronomy)
The outermost known satellite of Neptune, orbiting at a mean distance of 3,425,900 miles (5,513,400 kilometers) with a period of 360 days, 3.1 hours, and with a diameter of about 210 miles (340 kilometers).
References in periodicals archive ?
A lonely nereid drowsing half a-swoon Buried beneath her dark and dripping locks.
But the train of thought is provoked by the presence in the British Museum of the Nereid Monument, a brick-built tomb excavated at Xanthos in Lykia by Sir Charles Fellows in 1842 to the chagrin of Wilde's father, Sir William Wilde, who felt that his own explorations of Lykia at the same time as Fellows ought to have attracted equal attention.
But will Nereid sacrifice her immortality to become a mortal, joining Thomas and Serena back in Oxford, where Thomas's thesis is received in triumph?
In de Chirico's version, the two figures (with Nereid replaced by Siren) swim in the open sea.
Two nymphs (a reed-decked naiad from the river and a nereid from the sea into which it runs), more suntanned than Europa's silk-clad attendants, presciently whisper, snub-nose to attentive ear, as the bull starts to hoist himself from the ground.
In an article claiming the Elvetham pageantry as a source for details in Oberon's vision, Edith Rickert, citing a passage in Antony and Cleopatra, asserts that Shakespeare did not distinguish between Nereids and mermaids and that--in a highly questionable claim--the dramatist's phrase "dolphin's back" was a contemporary metaphor for a ship, which was sometimes synecdochically represented by its dolphin figurehead.
Located on the Passaic River, the Nereid Boat Club is one of New York City's only calm water rowing sites.
AMERICAN OAKS dead-heater Nereid lit up yesterday's opening session of Keeneland's Horses of All Ages Sale when fetching $1.
She was a member of NEREID Swim Club, Worcester Tennis Club and Holden Tennis Club.
Marc Quinn's solid gold statue of Moss, described as an "Aphrodite of our times", will find fitting setting at the centre of the Nereid Gallery, interacting with the great Greek beauties that surround it.
Jablonka is showing Philipp Taffe's painting Live by the Edge of the Sea (2004), a tight arrangement of underwater crustaceans that forms an intriguing parallel with Weber's Roman relief of a nereid and two tritons, from the third quarter of the 2nd century AD.
The 50kg statue will go on display in the Nereid Gallery of the British Museum, where it will be surrounded by beauties such as Crouching Venus, the goddess of love.