Nereidae

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Nereidae

[nə′rē·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A large family of mostly marine errantian annelids that have a well-defined head, elongated body with many segments, and large complex parapodia on most segments.

Nereidae

 

a family of polychaete worms. The body length is from 4 to 90 cm (most often 5–10 cm). Of the approximately 350 species, 30 are found in the USSR. The worms live predominantly in burrows in the littoral zones of seas; some can tolerate extreme desalination. Nereids are omnivorous. When approaching sexual maturity, many species are transformed into heterone-reid forms; in some the eyes and parapodia become unusually enlarged, swimming chaetae appear, and the worms rise to the surface of the water for reproduction. Nereids serve as food for fish and, during the reproductive period, for many birds.

REFERENCE

Ushakov, P. V. Mnogoshchetinkovye chervi dal’nevostochnykh morei SSSR (Polychaeta). Moscow-Leningrad, 1955. (Opredeliteli po faune SSSR, no. 56.)
References in periodicals archive ?
13 Goniadidae Lumbrineridae Maldanidae Nephtyidae Nereididae Oenonidae Onuphidae 1.
Chukchi n = 62 n = 30 Stomachs containing 92 93 invertebrates (%) Stomachs containing only 66 70 Taxon invertebrates (%) Invertebrates All Porifera All Polychaeta 5 17 Polynoidae 7 Nereididae, Nereis spp.
From Anja Schulze, biologist in Tex-as: "It is possible palolo were carried up in the Gulf Stream, but your photo more resembles the family nereididae.
Unfortunately, learning that these worms belonged to the family nereididae didn't lead to a direct understanding of what is happening in Palm Beach County, or how it relates to fishing.
4%, Nereididae from 9% to 1% and Sabellidae from 14% to 5%.
The families best represented were Capitellidae (19%), Spionidae (17%), Sabellidae (14%), Lumbrinereidae (11%), Nereididae (9%), Cossuridae (8%) and Syllidae (8%).
Spionidae, Nereididae, Sabellidae, Lumbrinereidae, Capitellidae and Syllidae families displayed high densities and wide distribution throughout the lagoon.
4% (1 species), Nereididae from 9% (5 species) to 1% (only 2 species) and Sabellidae from 14% to 5% (3 species).
The families best represented in 1995, by decreasing order of importance were Capitellidae, Spionidae, Sabellidae, Lumbrinereidae and Nereididae, they changed in 1998: Spionidae, Orbiinidae, Capitellidae, Syllidae, Sabellidae.