Nergal


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Nergal

(nŭr`gäl, –gəl), ancient deity worshiped in Babylonia and Assyria. He was a god of the midsummer sun, of war, of the chase, and of the dead. He could be beneficent, but he was primarily associated with pestilence and destruction. According to the Old Testament, he originated in Cuth (2 Kings 17.30).

Nergal

god ruling the world of dead. [Sumerian and Akkadian Myth.: Parrinder, 203]
References in periodicals archive ?
It's actually funny you know because, obviously we get some sh*t from some so-called die hards, then simultaneously they would just claim Venom or Bathory, being their biggest inspirations," Nergal said.
Nergal noted that this genre of music is underground and the nature of the music doesn't change even if 100,000 people turnup for a Behemoth concert.
The reason for their elation: Nergal survives in the form of a city built in his honor 4,000 years ago in Mesopotamia and identified Jan.
ID = lstar's Descent (ID1 = CT 15 45: 4-11, from Nineveh; ID2 = KAR 1' - 8', from Aur), NE = Nergal and Ereskigal (STT 28 iii: 1-5); G = Gilgames VII 184-91 (composite, see George 2003: 644).
Various other types of metamorphosis, including the homologous transformation of Tiamat's corpse in Enama elig Tablets IV and V, the various parts of which are used by Marduk to mold the familiar features of the Mesopotamian landscape; the transformation of the divine Nergal into a bald god with a tic in Nergal and Ere.
In the Akkadian literary texts, the situation is somewhat different: in Nergal and Erakigal, for example, of which an abbreviated Middle Babylonian copy is known, Anu sends his messenger Kakka to the netherworld to tell Eregkigal of a divine banquet; Eregkigal sends her vizier/messenger Namtar (here apparently not functioning as the harmful daimon Namtar) to the heavens to receive her portion of the banquet; and the god Nergal, sent to the netherworld as punishment for slighting Eregligal, tricks the netherworld's gatekeeper into releasing him on the pretense that he is acting as Eregkigal's messenger.
und Nergal zu sehen, die als Schirmherren uber die Planeten Merkur und Mars walten .
It may be the case, as Scurlock suggests, that these three children--that is, Nergal, Ninazu, and En-bililu--were to be sacrificed in order to ransom Enlil and the already-pregnant Ninlil from the Netherworld.
The gods--especially Marduk, Nergal, and Girru--are also often said in the penalty clauses of treaties to burn enemies with fire (using Akkadian sarapu and qamu).