Nero

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Nero

(Nero Claudius Caesar) (nēr`ō), A.D. 37–A.D. 68, Roman emperor (A.D. 54–A.D. 68). He was originally named Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus and was the son of Cnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus (consul in A.D. 32) and of Agrippina the YoungerAgrippina the Younger,
d. A.D. 59, Roman matron; daughter of Germanicus Caesar and Agrippina the Elder. By her first husband, Cneius Domitius Ahenobarbus, she was the mother of Nero.
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, who was the great-granddaughter of Augustus. Agrippina married (A.D. 49) Claudius IClaudius I
(Tiberius Claudius Drusus Nero Germanicus) , 10 B.C.–A.D. 54, Roman emperor (A.D. 41–A.D. 54), son of Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus and thus nephew of Tiberius. When Caligula was murdered (A.D.
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 and persuaded him to adopt Nero. In A.D. 55, Agrippina saw the bonds of her domination of Nero loosening and intrigued in favor of Claudius' son, Britannicus, but Nero poisoned the boy. Poppaea SabinaPoppaea Sabina
, d. A.D. 65, Roman empress, wife of Nero. While married to Otho, her second husband, she became mistress of Nero, whom she finally married in A.D. 62. She had great influence over Nero, inducing him to have his mother (Agrippina the Younger), his former wife
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, the wife of his friend OthoOtho, Marcus Salvius
, A.D. 32–A.D. 69, Roman emperor (Jan.–April, A.D. 69). He was a friend of Nero, and his wife, Poppaea Sabina, became Nero's mistress; Otho was repaid (A.D. 58) with the province of Lusitania. In A.D.
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, became his mistress; according to rumor she was to blame for the worst of Nero's behavior. In A.D. 59 he murdered his mother and in A.D. 62, his wife Octavia. He later married Poppaea. When half of Rome was burned in a fire (A.D. 64), Nero accused the Christians of starting it and began the first Roman persecution. In A.D. 65 there was a plot to make Caius Calpurnius Piso emperor. The detection of this plot began a string of violent deaths, e.g., of Seneca, Lucan, and Thrasea Paetus. Nero had ambitions to be a poet and artist. In A.D. 68 a series of revolts, including one by his own Praetorian Guard, caused him to commit suicide. Among his last words were, "What an artist the world is losing in me!" His memory was publicly execrated.

Bibliography

See biography by M. Griffin, Nero: The End of a Dynasty (1985).

Nero

 

(Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus). Born A.D. 37; died 68. Roman emperor from 54, of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

In the first years of his reign Nero ruled in concert with the Senate and was guided by Burrus, prefect of the praetorian guard, and by the philosopher Seneca. Later he instituted a policy of repressions and confiscations, which angered not only the senatorial elite (Piso’s conspiracy of A.D. 65) but other strata as well. Among Nero’s victims were his closest relatives, including his mother, and many such prominent people as Seneca, the poet Lucan, and the writer Petronius. In 68 the provincial governors Vindex and Galba rebelled against Nero. Abandoned even by the praetorians, Nero fled Rome and en route committed suicide. Historical sources portray Nero as narcissistic, cruel, and debauched, more engrossed in his “artistic” pursuits than in affairs of state, which he entrusted to his freedmen and court favorites.


Nero

 

(also Lake Rostov), a lake in Yaroslavl Oblast, RSFSR. It has an area of 54.4 sq km, a length of approximately 13 km, and a width of up to 8 km. Its depth averages 1–1.3 m; the maximum depth is 3.6 m. The bottom is covered with a thick layer of sapropel. Lake Nero is fed mainly by snow. The water level fluctuates by 3.2 m, with the highest levels occurring in April and May, and the lowest in October. The lake freezes in late October or in November; the ice breaks up in April. A total of 18 tributaries empty into the lake, the largest being the Sara River. Flow from Lake Nero is regulated by a dam with a sluice at the source of the Kotorosl’ River (a tributary of the Volga). There is local navigation on the lake and fishing for European bream, perch (Perca fluviatilis), and pike. The city of Rostov (Iaroslavskii) is on Lake Nero.

Nero

coarse, conceited, brutal emperor of Rome (37–68). [Polish Lit.: Quo Vadis, Magill I, 797–799]

Nero

(A.D. 37–68) hated as Roman emperor; led life of debauchery. [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 1909]

Nero

(37–68) Roman Emperor who is reported to have fiddled while Rome burned. [Rom. Hist.: Misc.]

Nero

(37–68) demented Roman emperor; initiated persecutions against the Christians. [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 1909]

Nero

(37–68) emperor said to have fiddled while Rome burned (64). [Rom. Hist.: Misc.]
See: Violin

Nero

full name Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus; original name Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus. 37--68 ad, Roman emperor (54--68). He became notorious for his despotism and cruelty, and was alleged to have started the fire (64) that destroyed a large part of Rome
References in periodicals archive ?
While he might be going too far in arguing Petronius' association with Nero came about from the author's desire to satirise him, Petronius--mindful of the downfall of several prominent Neronian courtiers, Seneca among them--could easily have adopted dissimulatio (vel vitiorum imitatione) as a survival mechanism.
As Pontus was annexed in 64, speculation runs rampant about a planned Neronian take-over of the Bosporan Kingdom.
The Elia-persona in "Roast Pig" may be as blind to personal failings as Encolpius, who mocks Trimalchio's shortcomings from the perspective of an arrogant blindness to his own pretensions and snobbery; but Lamb's readers, in spite of Elia's Neronian affinities, delightedly absolved him precisely because of his "gusto.
He then demonstrates that the interpretation of ancient sources is a difficult and complex task by analyzing the accounts of four notorious Neronian episodes: Claudius' death, the wooing of Poppaea Sabina, the fiddling while Rome burned, and the emperor's dying words.
The word itself derives from "grotta," the Italian word for "cave," and first referenced the discovery during the Renaissance of Neronian palace ruins heavily decorated, in the late-Roman style, with paintings "characterized by surprising hybridities--bizarre fusions of plant, animal, and human forms.
Opicius' assertions about his youth and incapacity parallel quite closely, for example, the conclusion of the Neronian Laus Pisonis 246-61.
For, while [Dorian] was but too ready to accept the position that was almost immediately offered to him on his coming of age, and found, indeed, a subtle pleasure in the thought that he might really become to London of his own day what to imperial Neronian Rome the author of the Satyricon once had been, yet in his inmost heart he desired to be something more than a mere arbiter elegantiarum, to be consulted on the wearing of a jewel, or the knotting of a necktie, or the conduct of a cane.
Secondly in the Satyricon, there is Petronius's creation of the epic poetry and the poetic criticism of the old fraud Eumolpus who offers a view and a sample (at some length) of Neronian poetry--the target here is Lucan--in a way still not understood.
Trainer Denise McHale made it two winners in 24 hours when Neronian won the latest in Brighton's lady riders' series.
SARA MOORE received a six-day ban for careless riding on the unplaced Ann's Mill in the Donatello Restaurant Lady Riders' Handicap won by Neronian at Brighton but had the consolation of winning the four-race series.
But, given today's realities, they cannot afford to be Neronian.
Petronius exploits another cliche of Neronian schooling by parodying the recognition scene, typified by Odysseus in epic and Orestes in tragedy.