Nersesian, Rachiia Nersesovich

Nersesian, Rachiia Nersesovich

 

Born Nov. 12 (24), 1895, in Nicomedia (now Izmit), Turkey; died Nov. 6, 1961, in Yerevan. Soviet Armenian actor. People’s Artist of the USSR (1956).

In 1915, Nersesian began acting in Armenian dramatic troupes in Turkey. Beginning in 1923 he was one of the leading actors of the G. Sundukian Armenian Theater in Yerevan. The acceptance in the Armenian theater of characters from Soviet drama is linked with Nersesian’s acting in such roles as Bersenev in Lavrenev’s The Break, Vershinin in Ivanov’s Armored Train 14–69, and Safonov in Simonov’s The Russian People. Nersesian’s portrayal of tragic and satirical roles—including Elizbarov in Shirvanzade’s For Honor, Protasov in Tolstoy’s The Living Corpse, and Bagdasar in Paronian’s Uncle Bagdasar —was distinguished by profound thought and vivid emotions. His performances of Shakespeare became theatrical landmarks—for example, his Macbeth, Othello, and Falstaff (The Merry Wives of Windsor). From 1920, Nersesian acted in films; his roles included Rustam in Namus (1925), the title role in Pepo (1935), and Akopian in Zangezur (1938; State Prize of the USSR, 1941). He was awarded the Order of Lenin, the Order of the Badge of Honor, and various medals.

REFERENCES

Arsharuni, A. Grachiia Nersesian. [Moscow] 1940.
Hrach’ya Nersisyan. (Zhoghovatsu nvirvats kyank’in yev t’aterakan gortsuneutyane.) Yerevan, 1970.
References in classic literature ?
In Pollyanna's room Fluffy had just jumped to the bed with a little purring "meow" of joy when through the open door sounded clearly and sharply Aunt Polly's agonized exclamation.
Acting on the same friendly impulse both ran after him through the open door.
The unnamed Horror was looking at her through his open door.
The open door of the smoking-room showed that room also to be empty.
In the open door, his hand on the knob to close it after him, he halted a second time.
With hot heart I took the green winding path, and presently came the little grassy glade, and the bubbling crystal well, and the hut of wattled boughs, and, looking through the open door of the hut, I saw a lovely girl lying asleep in her golden hair.
Lady Arabella, after looking around her, slipped in by the open door, and he could, of course, see her no longer.
I got to an open door, and saw the bodies of two Indians
So vivid and mordant was the impression that I can live over again that slow descent of the station hill, the passing by the nurse-girl with the two babes, the sight of the old horse on his knees between the shafts, the cabman twisted across his seat, and the young man inside with his hand upon the open door in the very act of springing out.
Then he lit a cigar and went and sat near the open door to smoke it.
Hussey hurried towards an open door leading to the kitchen, and bawling out clam for two, disappeared.
The fresh air that had come in through the open door made it easier to breathe, but the rushing sound overhead grew louder, and as I looked upward through the bars of my empty rack I saw a red light flickering on the wall.