NIC

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NIC

(networking)

NIC

(hardware)

NIC

Abbr. for “not in the contract.”

noise isolation class (NIC)

A single-number rating derived from measured values of noise reduction between two enclosed spaces that are connected by one or more paths.

NIC

(1) (Network Interface Card) See network adapter. See also InterNIC.

(2) (New Internet Computer) An earlier Linux-based computer from The New Internet Computer Company (NICC), Palo Alto, CA. The NIC was a pure Web appliance without disk drives, and the OS, Java Virtual Machine and browser all resided on a CD-ROM. An Internet storage service was required to save files, but bookmarks were saved in flash memory. For email, a Web-based service was required. Co-founded in 2000 by Oracle magnate Larry Ellison, the NIC was a new incarnation of the network computer, but it never caught on. See network computer and Internet appliance.


The NIC
The Linux-based New Internet Computer was a pure Web appliance introduced in 2000 at USD $199 sans monitor. Without drives, files had to be stored on an Internet storage service. (Image courtesy of The New Internet Computer Company.)
References in periodicals archive ?
As noted earlier, most municipal bond studies operationalize interest costs using NIC, the net interest cost.
The second quarter 2008 and six months ended June 30, 2008 financial results were also favorably impacted by lower net interest costs and higher pretax net equity investment income.
The decrease in 2008 fourth quarter net income was due to the decline in operating income, discussed above, offset by lower net interest costs in fiscal year 2008.
For the 2008 first quarter, net interest costs decreased to $10.
Longs' results were also hindered by an eight-fold escalation in net interest costs to $4.
The higher operating income, as described above and in the segment results below, was partially offset by higher net interest costs in 2007.
Depreciation, amortization and net interest costs are expected to approximate $123 million.
However, Fitch anticipates meaningful improvement in these metrics throughout 2006 owing to improved profitability as well as lower net interest costs and lower net leverage due to recent delevering actions.
Partially offsetting those negative trends at the bottom line, net interest costs decreased 9.
By paying vendors earlier, the state can reduce net interest costs by approximately $22 million.