Net metering


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Net metering

A method of crediting customers for electricity that they generate onsite in excess of their own electricity consumption. If customers generate more than they use in a billing period, their electric meter turns backwards to indicate their net excess generation. Depending on individual state or utility rules, the net excess generation may be credited to their account, or carried over to a future billing period.
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References in periodicals archive ?
net metering service to any electric consumer that the electric utility serves;"
Currently, net metering is available for projects up to 50 kilowatts at the discretion of the local energy distribution companies.
Net metering programs are summarized in the same report from information collected by the EIA.
Under net metering, PG&E is required to credit solar-energy producers at the retail rate for the time of day the energy is returned to the grid.
Currently, homeowners and businessowners who install PV systems are only eligible for a state tax credit that tops out at $1,750, not enough to make net metering economically desirable.
The concept of Net metering also known as net energy metering, started as a solar incentive that allows users to store energy in the electric grid.
Specifically, Liberty Utilities deliberately uses the energy supplied to them by their net metering customers, who are located on their distribution system, to reduce the default service supply energy and capacity they need to purchase from third-party suppliers through the ISO-New England system.
"We can better use the solar energy for overcoming our energy crisis by launching net metering system," he said.
SirajPower has so far secured contracts with a combined capacity of 50 MW under Dubai's net metering scheme, the Shams Dubai initiative by Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA).
The connection and regulatory approvals for net metering previously required six months to complete but now only takes a maximum of one month giving solar installers more agility to close in on new connections and save time and operational costs.
That 1-1 ratio is locked in for current customers under state regulations on net metering, the accounting system that tracks home generation.