NetWare


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Related to NetWare: NetWare client, Novell NetWare

NetWare

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NetWare

A family of network operating systems from Novell that in the early 1990s was the largest installed base of LAN operating systems. NetWare was a server OS that supported Windows, Mac, DOS and OS/2 clients, as well as Unix via third party support. After networking was added to Windows, and TCP/IP became the default network protocol, NetWare eventually faded into history. See TCP/IP and NetWare peer-to-peer network.

Proprietary and Problematic
The hard drives in NetWare servers required special formatting, and although DOS and Windows apps could reside in the server, they could only run in the server if they were recompiled into a NetWare module (see NLM). NetWare also used its own IPX and SPX protocols until NetWare 5 included TCP/IP (see IPX, SPX and NCP).

NetWare History
In 1985, 16-bit NetWare 2.x (originally Advanced NetWare 286) supported 100 users. In 1989, NetWare 386 was the first 32-bit version. Renamed NetWare 3.11 in 1992, it had a limit of 250 concurrent users and employed the Novell bindery directory (see bindery). In 1993, NetWare 4 introduced the acclaimed Novell Directory Service (see eDirectory). In 2003, NetWare 6.5 was the final release. See NetWare 5, NetWare 6, MHS and Novell.


NetWare Protocols
When comparing NetWare's protocol stack with the OSI model, one major difference was the Link Support Layer (LSL) interface for network drivers. ODI and NDIS were common implementations (see LSL, ODI and NDIS).
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References in periodicals archive ?
As CEO of the company, Messman's task now is to find ways to take the services that NetWare delivered, such as file and print sharing, messaging and collaboration, and expand them beyond the sinking legacy product by embracing Linux.
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The following server platforms are supported: Novell NetWare 4.x /5.x/6.x, the supported protocols are TCP/IP and IPX/SPX.
The new software scans Novell's eDirectory and the NetWare file system for specific security policy violations, identifying vulnerabilities and risks, automatically collects specified audit data, and prepares reports quickly in easy to read formats.
"NetWare 6 has already proven itself more stable than Windows 2000," said Jim Acevedo, IDACORP Energy network and infrastructure manager.
Future release plans include Novell NetWare v5.l server support for WebCollection Plus English/Spanish and WebCollection Plus English/French.
"By allowing our Windows, Macintosh, UNIX and Linux clients to natively access NetWare storage right out of the box, we will be able to integrate users into the network as never before.
NetWare 6 is available now for the price of USD184 per user license.
Also from Prosoft, NetWare 5 Services and the NetWare Client 5.13 allow Mac users to be connected to the NetWare environment.
Release 5.30 provides CD-R and CD-RW support, and it handles DVD-ROMs with up to 9 GB, caching for 255 CDs, and Pure IP communications in Novell's NetWare environment and SLPv2.
The two leading systems for small businesses are Novell's NetWare and Microsoft's Windows NT.
Based on standard network operating systems and standard, commercial-grade Pentium systems, these servers are the result of advanced circuit design and the acceptance of Microsoft NT and Novell NetWare as the network operating systems of choice.