NetWare client


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NetWare client

A desktop machine in a NetWare network, which used proprietary communications protocols to access a NetWare server (see IPX and NCP). Known as a "NetWare shell," Microsoft and Novell provided client software for Windows. Unix and Mac NetWare shells were also available. As of NetWare 5 in 1998, NetWare natively supported TCP/IP, the Internet protocol that was becoming the global standard. See NetWare and NetWare 6.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But Adobe could face tough competition if Novell decides to bundle Envoy viewers with every NetWare client. Lotus Notes is another wild card: Any viewer integrated with Notes instantly becomes an important standard.
Even so, because of addressing conflicts in translating between NetWare and FDDI frames, it's impossible to bridge traffic from a NetWare client on a token-ring LAN to a NetWare server on the FDDI network, and a router is needed.
NetWare client server software is available under OS/2 along with versions of Oracle database programs.
-- Bundled, out-of-the-box support for 30-plus popular applications such as Adobe Acrobat Reader, Apple QuickTime, Lotus Notes, McAfee ViruScan, Microsoft Internet Explorer and Office, Netscape Navigator, Norton AntiVirus, Novell NetWare Client, RealPlayer and WinZip.

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