NetMeeting


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NetMeeting

One of the early collaboration and conferencing programs introduced in 1996 by Microsoft and retired in late 2003 by the company. NetMeeting was bundled as part of Windows and included point-to-point telephony and video calling capability over the Internet as well as multipoint whiteboard and application sharing.

The advent of instant messaging (IM) and other alternatives for online, real-time communication contributed to its demise. Microsoft announced a replacement online meeting service called Office Live Meeting, formerly from PlaceWare, a company Microsoft acquired in 2003. See ULS server.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Prior to that, those of us in videoconferencing had to rely on something called T.120, which was the basis for Microsoft's NetMeeting.
Regarding RQ5, "platforms and tools" is considered as a code and as sub-codes the categories considered were "LMS" or "LMS- embedded tools" or any "general tool" such as social media like Facebook or Blogger, communication tools like Skype or NetMeeting, etc.
It also revealed that she had the opportunity to enrich her skills by learning from others how to use tools such as Microsoft Project, Publisher, and NetMeeting. The skills matrix showed each employee's expanded capabilities so that everyone could fill in more easily for one another when someone was on vacation.
For real-time instruction, Meeting Point and Microsoft NetMeeting were selected.
For example, Microsoft's NetMeeting is included in Windows 2000 and is also available for free download from the NetMeeting homepage.
Students could work from home or from an on-campus computing lab, using screen sharing applications (such as Microsoft NetMeeting) or collaborative editors (such as Eclipse, with various plugins) for virtual pair programming, and a web-conference environment (Centra Live) that enabled them to participate in virtual, instructor-led, laboratory sessions.
One immediate change is that computers, collaborative suites (such as Adobe NetMeeting and Microsoft Breeze), and Army Battle Command System (ABCS) equipment are available in all units from the brigade to the company level.
In video conference systems which use software like NetMeeting, the transmitted video depends on the bandwidth of the network, and if the software is sufficient, then small chat groups can be established in which more than one user can have audio and video connection at the same time.
Means of collaboration include both technological (videoconferences, Netmeeting, collaborative design software, etc.) and organizational processes (e.g., multi-site R&D project teams, global project management protocols, cross-cultural training).
Some of the simpler products include NetMeeting, which is
Among these features were the ability to convert print or cursive writing from the whiteboard into document-ready text; to print, e-mail, fax and create web pages directly from the whiteboard; to use Windows NetMeeting for distance or virtual collaboration; to record an entire session to be played later with full video and audio; to capture and share notes immediately; and, to drag and drop material into any Windows application.
It was purchased by Microsoft (microsoft.com), and in the 1990s, reintroduced as NetMeeting. Another early commercial product and the current market leader in Web conferencing is WebEx (webex.com), introduced in 1996.