information warfare

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information warfare

Also called "cyberterrorism" and "cyberwarfare," it refers to creating havoc by disrupting the computers that manage stock exchanges, power grids, air traffic control, telecommunications and defense systems. The traditional viruses, Trojans and denial of service attacks are part of the arsenal, all aimed at disrupting a government rather than a company. See virus, Trojan and denial of service attack.

Information warfare is increasingly the first offensive move before the start of a physical attack. The military in many countries have full-time cyberwarriors on the payroll, because the more successful a cyberattack on an early warning defense system, the greater the success of the real attack. For example, according to the book "Cyber War," North Korea may have as many as a thousand hackers stationed in China, working on knocking out systems in South Korea and other countries.

The first book to deal with the subject was "Information Warfare: Chaos on the Electronic Superhighway," written by Winn Schwartau in 1994. Cited above, "Cyber War," by Richard A. Clarke and Robert K. Knake is an eye-opening treatise on the subject, released in 2010.
References in periodicals archive ?
Netwar theory proves a useful lens through which to view recent history.
Government efforts to conduct cyberdefense/cyberwar/ NETWAR are badly fragmented and require greater central authority and integration/synchronization of overall cyberspace operations.
Betancourt's concept of netwar greatly facilitated our understanding of the present state of low-intensity conflict in our societies.
Edwards, "The Networking of Terror in the Information Age," in Networks and Netwars, ed.
For a full discussion of netwar, see Stefan Eisen, Jr.
The origins of this concept are from John Arquilla and David Ronfeldt, The Advent of Netwar (Santa Monica, Calif.
We designed the experiment to support fleet priorities, systems command technical support and Naval NETWAR FORCEnet Enterprise (NNFE) requirements.
Each netWAR battle allows up to thirty opponents to
Also see John Arquilla, David Ronfeldt, and Michele Zanini, "Networks, Netwar, and Information-Age Terrorism," in Howard and Sawyer, 96-119.
The Naval NETWAR FORCEnet Enterprise (NNFE) is spearheading these efforts to provide warfighters with just the right tools for effective networking with likely coalition partners.
25-26 San Diego Chapter Naval NETWAR FORCEnet Enterprise & Industry Conference Bahia Hotel & Resort, San Diego, CA
Starting today, customers may purchase netWAR directly from Headland via the Internet at www.