Neurobiology

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Neurobiology

Study of the development and function of the nervous system, with emphasis on how nerve cells generate and control behavior. The major goal of neurobiology is to explain at the molecular level how nerve cells differentiate and develop their specific connections and how nerve networks store and recall information. Ancillary studies on disease processes and drug effects in the nervous system also provide useful approaches for understanding the normal state by comparison with perturbed or abnormal systems. The functions of the nervous system may be studied at several levels: molecular, subcellular (organelle), cellular, simple multicellular interacting systems, complex systems, and higher functions (whole animal behavior). See Biopotentials and ionic currents, Memory, Motor systems, Nervous system (invertebrate), Nervous system (vertebrate), Nervous system disorders, Neuron, Sense organ, Synaptic transmission

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Freeman's perspective clashes with materialist theories, which conceive of the mind as a by-product of biological happenings in the brain--the interplay of billions of neurons for most neurobiologists, a cerebral stew of chemical and hormonal interactions for geneticists and pharmacologists, and the commingling of quantum forces for physicists.
We based the model on the best and most recent biological findings developed by neurobiologists on the various phases of the cycle and built our mathematical equations from that foundation.
Mending the shattered spine and flooding deadened limbs with life, a feat considered unthinkable just a decade ago, represents climbing Mount Everest for many neurobiologists. It also sustains the hopes of paralyzed actor Christopher Reeve and 90,000 others nationwide who share his plight.
For at least a century, neurobiologists have suspected that developing nerve cells are somehow told what connections to make.
Twenty years later, neurobiologists began pondering a strange movement disorder that affected a tribe indigenous to New Guinea.
Just as the increasing sophistication of microscopy techniques have enabled neurobiologists to view nerve cells as they never could before, tools borrowed from mathematicians and physicists are now providing new insights into the electrical activity of these cells.
By transplanting brain tissue from specially bred rats into normal rats, neurobiologists have homed in on a brain region that can cause hypertension.
For years, neurobiologists have debated the role of a peptide called beta-amyloid in the development of Alzheimer's disease (SN: 1/1/94, p.8).
Nevertheless, two groups of neurobiologists are making headway.
New imaging and analytical techniques have enabled neurobiologists to gather evidence that these immune system cells play critical roles in the destruction of injured or aging nerve cells, in brain development, and in AIDS-related problems in the central nervous system.
Now neurobiologists have discovered that a particular "channel" molecule that allows potassium ions to move in and out of cells is missing or nonfunctional in people with Alzheimer's.
Neurobiologists studying visual processing in the barn owl (Tyto alba) now report that the owl's brain perceives depth using the same computations it uses to determine the location of sounds.

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