neuroinformatics


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neuroinformatics

The analysis of the data derived from the study of the brain (neuroscience). The goal of neuroinformatics is to learn more about the interactions of the human brain and nervous system. In 2003, the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) in Washington, D.C. formed the Brain Information Group (BIG). See neurotechnology, neuroengineering and neural network.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tan Le is the founder and CEO of EMOTIV, a neuroinformatics company advancing understanding of the human brain using electroencephalography (EEG).
Ascoli et al., "The neuroscience information framework: a data and knowledge environment for neuroscience," Neuroinformatics, vol.
In doing so, we are contributing to the future use of complex, multi-fingered robot hands, which today are still too costly or complex to be used, for instance, in industry," explained neuroinformatics Professor Helge Ritter, who heads the Famula project together with sports scientist and cognitive psychologist Professor Thomas Schack and robotics Privatdozent Sven Wachsmuth.
Krichmar, "Allen Brain Atlas-Driven Visualizations: a web-based gene expression energy visualization tool," Frontiers in Neuroinformatics, vol.
Paxinos, "Neuroanatomical affiliation visualization-interface system," Neuroinformatics, vol.
Brette, "Brian: a simulator for spiking neural networks in python," Frontiers in Neuroinformatics, vol.
Ghalem et al., "Molecular interaction of acetylcholinesterase with carnosic acid derivatives: a neuroinformatics study," CNS & Neurological Disorders--Drug Targets, vol.
Wintermark et al., "Optimal symmetric multimodal templates and concatenated random forests for supervised brain tumor segmentation (simplified) with ANTsR," Neuroinformatics, vol.
Professor Marcus Kaiser, Professor of Neuroinformatics at Newcastle University, said: "The next steps are to compare the computationally predicted outcomes with the actual surgery outcomes in individual patients and to investigate how alternative surgery targets can be included in the future treatment."
In neuroscience, the project will use neuroinformatics and brain simulation to collect and integrate experimental data, identifying and filling gaps in our knowledge and prioritising future experiments.