neuropeptide

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neuropeptide

[‚nu̇r·ō′pep‚tīd]
(neuroscience)
A polypeptide released by axons at the synapse; it may act as a neurotransmitter and have a direct effect on synapse function or as a neuromodulator, having a long-term effect on postsynaptic neurons.
References in periodicals archive ?
The team discovered that heparin stimulates the AgRP neurons located in the hypothalamus, one of the most important appetite-modulating neurons, which results in increased production of AgRP protein, a neuropeptide that stimulates food intake.
As detailed in a recent review [13], potential pathophysiologic factors shared between chronic pain and PTSD include deficits in neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the neuroactive gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic steroids allopregnanolone and its equipotent stereoisomer pregnanolone (together termed ALLO) [14-20].
Neuropeptides, meanwhile, work with DMAE to create a smooth skin texture that softens the look of fine lines in the Perricone MD Neuropeptide Face Activator.
Neuropeptides are released from neurons through a process that -- like other secretory events -- is triggered primarily by the influx of calcium into the neuron through voltage-gated channels.
USDA's Agricultural Research Service has named Ronald Nachman Distinguished Senior Research Scientist of 2012 in recognition of his discoveries regarding insect neuropeptides that have opened the door to novel, environmentally sound strategies for controlling some of the most threatening agricultural pests.
It is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the central nervous system (CNS) and is considered an important regulating factor in emotional behavior.
They cover the history of psychiatry and neuroscience, receptor signaling and the cell biology of synaptic transmission, the genetics of schizophrenia, neurological and psychiatric aspects of emotion, cognitive neuropsychological research methods, structural imaging in psychiatric disorders, human functional neuroimaging, neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in depression, animal models, psychiatric epidemiology, emerging methods in the molecular biology of neuropsychiatric disorders, clinical psychoneuroimmunology, and psychiatric rating scales.
The main neurotransmitters include dopamine, endogenous opioids, endocannabinoids, serotonin, and glutamate, although it is likely that other neurotransmitters as well as neuropeptides are also involved (Figure 1).
Appearance of neuropeptides and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in the circulation can be an indication of membrane destruction (Khalimbetov, 2011; Barashneva, 2001).
Involvement of prostaglandins, sensory neuropeptides and vanilloid TRPV-1 receptors.