Neustria


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Neustria

(no͞os`trēə), western portion of the kingdom of the FranksFranks,
group of Germanic tribes. By the 3d cent. A.D., they were settled along the lower and middle Rhine. The two major divisions were the Salian Franks in the north and the Ripuarian Franks in the south.
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 in the 6th, 7th, and 8th cent., during the rule of the MerovingiansMerovingians,
dynasty of Frankish kings, descended, according to tradition, from Merovech, chief of the Salian Franks, whose son was Childeric I and whose grandson was Clovis I, the founder of the Frankish monarchy.
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. It comprised the Seine and Loire country and the region to the north; its principal towns were Soissons and Paris. The realm originated with the several partitions of the lands of Clovis IClovis I
, c.466–511, Frankish king (481–511), son of Childeric I and founder of the Merovingian monarchy. Originally little more than a tribal chieftain, he became sole leader of the Salian Franks by force of perseverance and by murdering a number of relatives.
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 (d. 511) among his sons and grandsons during the 6th cent. The dynastic rivalry involved Neustria in almost constant warfare with the eastern portion of the Frankish kingdom, which became known as AustrasiaAustrasia
, northeastern portion of the Merovingian kingdom of the Franks in the 6th, 7th, and 8th cent., comprising, in general, parts of E France, W Germany, and the Netherlands, with its capital variously at Metz, Reims, and Soissons.
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. The conflict culminated in the long and bitter war between Queen FredegundeFredegunde
, c.545–597, Frankish queen. The mistress of King Chilperic I of Neustria, she became his wife after inducing him to murder his wife Galswintha (567). Fredegunde and Brunhilda, Galswintha's sister and wife of King Sigebert I of Austrasia, were among the leading
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 of Neustria (d. 597) and Queen BrunhildaBrunhilda
or Brunehaut
, d. 613, Frankish queen, wife of Sigebert I of the East Frankish kingdom of Austrasia; daughter of Athanagild, the Visigothic king of Spain.
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 of Austrasia (d. 613). Neustria and Austrasia were reunited briefly by Clotaire IClotaire I
, d. 561, Frankish king, son of Clovis I. On his father's death (511) he and his brothers received equal shares of the Frankish kingdom. His capital was at Soissons.
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, Clotaire IIClotaire II,
d. 629, Frankish king, son of Chilperic I and Fredegunde. He succeeded (584) his father as king of Neustria, but his mother ruled for him until her death (597).
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, and Dagobert IDagobert I
, c.612–c.639, Frankish king, son and successor of King Clotaire II. His father was forced to appoint Dagobert king of the East Frankish kingdom of Austrasia at the request of Pepin of Landen, mayor of the palace, and Arnulf, bishop of Metz, who effectively
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. After Dagobert the kings sank to insignificance, while the mayors of the palace rose in power. In 687, Pepin of HeristalPepin of Heristal
(Pepin II) , d. 714, mayor of the palace (680–714) of the Frankish territory of Austrasia; grandson of Pepin of Landen and father of Charles Martel.
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, mayor of the palace of the king of Austrasia, defeated his Neustrian rival and united Austrasia and Neustria. His descendants, the CarolingiansCarolingians
, dynasty of Frankish rulers, founded in the 7th cent. by Pepin of Landen, who, as mayor of the palace, ruled the East Frankish Kingdom of Austrasia for Dagobert I.
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, continued to rule the two realms, first as mayors and after 751 as kings.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Neustria

 

the western portion of the Frankish state of the Merovingians; it had a mixed Frankish and Gallo-Roman population and embraced the region between the Schelde and the Loire rivers. During the sixth and seventh centuries, it was periodically an independent kingdom. Neustria’s political history was one of struggle between its own kings and rulers and the kings and rulers of Austrasia. In 687 the struggle ended with the victory of the Austrasian majordomos.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Neustria

the western part of the kingdom of the Merovingian Franks formed in 561 ad in what is now N France
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
For the division of the Frankish realms between Karloman and Pippin, which does not completely correspond with Austrasia and Neustria, see Heinz Joachim Schussler, "Die frankische Reichsteilung von VieuxPoitiers (742) und die Reform der Kirche in den Teilreichen Karlmanns und Pippins.
The locator maps of countries in the ancient and medieval kingdoms of Europe and Africa (like Neustria and Zaria) are an extra bonus in Women Leaders, and so is the timeline that puts their ruling periods in perspective.
Bioassay of nucleopolyhedrosis virus against larval instars of Malacosoma neustria. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 25:343-348.
Felice Lifshitz examines how these former pagan scourges of Christian settlements managed to portray themselves as Christian deliverers in her ironically titled book, The Norman Conquest of Pious Neustria. Lifshitz's book is an only slightly revised doctoral dissertation, which means that she does not write with the style and grace of Martinez Pizarro, although she does include several amusing interlingual puns involving both English and French components.
The king mentioned is Theuderic III, King of Neustria and Burgundy (673-690/1).
The first chapter studies remembrance of the past in three diverse areas: the Piedmont and lower Rhone region, Neustria, and Bavaria.
The first section of Roman de Rou relates the history of the region of northern France formerly known as Neustria, and the resistance of the western peoples, from rural workers to barons, against the dukes of Normandy in Rouen.