Neustria

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Neustria

Neustria (no͞osˈtrēə), western portion of the kingdom of the Franks in the 6th, 7th, and 8th cent., during the rule of the Merovingians. It comprised the Seine and Loire country and the region to the north; its principal towns were Soissons and Paris. The realm originated with the several partitions of the lands of Clovis I (d. 511) among his sons and grandsons during the 6th cent. The dynastic rivalry involved Neustria in almost constant warfare with the eastern portion of the Frankish kingdom, which became known as Austrasia. The conflict culminated in the long and bitter war between Queen Fredegunde of Neustria (d. 597) and Queen Brunhilda of Austrasia (d. 613). Neustria and Austrasia were reunited briefly by Clotaire I, Clotaire II, and Dagobert I. After Dagobert the kings sank to insignificance, while the mayors of the palace rose in power. In 687, Pepin of Heristal, mayor of the palace of the king of Austrasia, defeated his Neustrian rival and united Austrasia and Neustria. His descendants, the Carolingians, continued to rule the two realms, first as mayors and after 751 as kings.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Neustria

 

the western portion of the Frankish state of the Merovingians; it had a mixed Frankish and Gallo-Roman population and embraced the region between the Schelde and the Loire rivers. During the sixth and seventh centuries, it was periodically an independent kingdom. Neustria’s political history was one of struggle between its own kings and rulers and the kings and rulers of Austrasia. In 687 the struggle ended with the victory of the Austrasian majordomos.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Neustria

the western part of the kingdom of the Merovingian Franks formed in 561 ad in what is now N France
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Chronological range: 56-55.5 Ma (MP7, Neustrian, lowermost Eocene).
Remarks: This genus has been identified in several Spanish and French localities, ranging from the Neustrian (MP8+9) to the Geiseltalian (MP12).
It has been identified in Neustrian (MP8+9) and Grauvian (MP10) sites.
Aldebert is condemned as a heretic for the first time at a Neustrian council, where there is no mention of Clemens.
Rouche mentions some sort of Aquitanian opposition,(102) and we hear from later sources that Aquitaine was indeed a stronghold of opposition to the Frankish court.(103) Yet, it is doubtful whether these feelings were as widespread in the seventh century as they were to become in the eighth or the ninth.(104) Finally, one should not underestimate the fact that Longoretus was founded by a native of Bourges, on a Burgundian possession, and in a region under Neustrian influence.
It consigns under the title Neustrian Associates, which derives from an old French name for the Manche and Orne areas of Normandy.
Last August at Deauville, Neustrian had 15 yearlings catalogued, of whom 11 were offered and ten were sold for a total of Ff4,097,000 (about pounds 400,000).
This year, Neustrian's August consignment has grown in size to 18, and among that collection is Maille Pistol's half-brother by Epervier Bleu (lot 171).
Last year, Neustrian Associates was one of the vendors who reached the million-franc mark for a yearling, but this time all 10 of its yearlings from the Haras du Buff will be offered on the Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday.
But, far from being grateful for the Neustrians for establishing this precedent, the Normans instead denominated their predecessors as what Lifshitz, in a structuralist gesture, terms "not-Christian" (11).
The historians have to endorse the Normans, at least for reasons of expediency; they also have to explain why they won over many opponents, most of which, like Lifshitz's Neustrians, were inconveniently Christian.