Nevers


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Nevers

(nəvĕr`), city (1991 pop. 43,889), capital of Nièvre dept., central France, on the Loire and Nièvre rivers. It is noted for its pottery and china industries. Other manufactures include metal products, mechanical and electrical equipment, chemicals, textiles, and printed matter. Nevers became the seat of a bishopric in the 6th cent. and was long the capital of the duchy and province of NivernaisNivernais
, region and former province, central France. It roughly coincides with Nièvre dept. Drained by the Loire and the Yonne, it is a hilly plateau, rising to the Morvan Mts. in the east. It has metallurgical, chemical, and livestock industries.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Among the points of interest are the ducal palace (15th–16th cent.), now a courthouse; the Church of St. Étienne (11th cent.), a gem of Romanesque architecture; the cathedral (13th–16th cent.); and the Church of St. Bernadette-du-Banlay (1966). In the Convent of St. Gildard are the remains of St. Bernadette, who lived there from 1860 to 1879.

Nevers

 

a city in central France, on the Loire River. Capital of Nièvre Department. Population, 45,000 (1968). River port and railroad junction. The industries of Nevers manufacture agricultural machinery, railroad equipment, airplane parts, and china and faience.

Nevers

a city in central France: capital of the former duchy of Nivernais; engineering industry. Pop.: 40 932 (1999)
References in periodicals archive ?
The most recent wave of data also shows that 60% of Cord Nevers said they are "very satisfied" with their current TV access situation, compared to 50% of Cord Cutters.
Large percentages of Cord Nevers (43%) and Cord Cutters (50%) define "TV" as anything they can watch specifically on a TV set; but 29% of both Cutters and Nevers say that TV is "anything (they) can view on any device" (including a smartphone or tablet).
A detailed examination of the duc de Nevers's religious-political advocacy for an anti-Calvinist crusade in France in the 1570s and 1580s reveals religious motivations in a complexity rarely so perceptible in contemporary sources.
Les ducs de Nevers et l'etat royal contributes to the growing new historical literature on the French Wars of Religion by revealing the religious motivations and political approaches of Louis de Gonzague through a unique combination of manuscript sources.
Forty-five minutes in, after a valiant battle in which he is fatally stabbed in the back by Gonzague, the dying Nevers entrusts Lagardere with the infant and asks his friend to avenge him, however long it takes.
The Nevers Thrust makes a sudden resurgence, and an unsuspecting Gonzague hires a new bossu - the hunchback of the tide.