New Economy


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New Economy

Coined in the late 1990s, the New Economy referred to the impact of the Internet on the economy. It stated that traditional measures of value were no longer valid because technology was changing the world so quickly and dramatically.

The New Economy implied that any company not embracing the Internet in a big way was doomed to fail, and its mantra was "gain market share at all cost." After the dot-com failures began in 2000, the term lost much of its luster. Needless to say, Internet-based companies have flourished ever since. See digital economy and economies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Detroit Regional Chamber, the DTE Energy Foundation and WXYZ-TV Channel 7 hosted the "Higher Education and the New Economy" Town Hall on April 30.
states in meeting the challenges of the "knowledge-based, globalized, entrepreneurial, IT-driven and innovation-based New Economy." Specifically, "Massachusetts ranks No.
In the new economy, quality does not guarantee jobs, and low costs and tight management control are the ultimate goal.
WIDER undertook a major initiative to better understand the relationship between development and the new economy. This initiative, under the direction of Matti Pohjola (University of Helsinki) involved three interrelated research projects undertaken between 1998 and 2003: 'Information Technology and Growth', 'Production, Employment, and Income Distribution in the Global Digital Economy', and 'Information Technology and Global Economic Development'.
This New Economy is forcing all of us to change and adapt at an accelerated rate.
The new economy Cleveland hopes to create, with top jobs in research and engineering, seems to have no immediate place for these same high school graduates.
Keywords: New economy; Information economy; Pricing strategy; Transactions costs; Imperfect competition; Revenue maximization
It was apparent from the questioning of counsel during oral argument in the Catalina case that the court is very concerned about the effect its decision will have on the development of the new economy, which involves the increasing prevalence of rendition of services versus sale of goods.
And New Economy guru George Gilder was getting respectful write-ups in The New York Times.
Traditional sectors continued to decline, while growth in what has been dubbed the "new economy," considered to be the emerging service-and technology-based sectors, helped fuel the boom.
Doug Henwood, After the New Economy (New York: The New Press, 2003), 269 pages, hardcover $24.95.
Linneman describes the paradox of the growth of employment in the midst of manufacturing declines as a continuing changeover to new economy industries.