New Nobility

New Nobility

 

a widely used name for the portion of the 16th- and 17th-century English nobility that, unlike the old feudal nobility, was able to adapt to the development of capitalist relations. It emerged as the main ally of the bourgeoisie during the English Civil War. The majority of the new nobility were of the minor and middle nobility, that is, members of the gentry.

References in classic literature ?
For new nobility is but the act of power, but ancient nobility is the act of time.
Therefore, O my brethren, a NEW NOBILITY is needed, which shall be the adversary of all populace and potentate rule, and shall inscribe anew the word "noble" on new tables.
For many noble ones are needed, and many kinds of noble ones, FOR A NEW NOBILITY! Or, as I once said in parable: "That is just divinity, that there are Gods, but no God!"
O my brethren, I consecrate you and point you to a new nobility: ye shall become procreators and cultivators and sowers of the future;--
Your CHILDREN'S LAND shall ye love: let this love be your new nobility,-- the undiscovered in the remotest seas!
a new nobility is conferred in groves and pastures, and not in castles or by the sword-blade any longer.
By the time it is ready to be released back into the flock, there is a new nobility to the little lamb.
After an introduction to situate the reader in early 15th-century Rome, the first chapter examines how Pope Martin V interpreted Rome, with particular emphasis on Niccolo Signorili's Descriptio urbis Romae and Masolino's triptych the 'Miracle of the Snow.' McCahill argues that Martin V worked with the new nobility in Rome to promote their and the city's interests.
Although Gerber points to influential texts and widely publicized cases that served as pivots for these changes, he relates the arguments to larger socioeconomic and political forces, such as anxieties over competition with the new nobility of the robe in the seventeenth century and the spread of access to litigation in the eighteenth century.
Once political participation in the Great Council was restricted, membership in it defined a new nobility. Election was no longer a means to entry and membership became hereditary.
He claims his colleague Igor Domnikov was beaten to death in 2000 and the mastermind of the attack - thought to be a local governor - was never brought to justice.The author of The New Nobility: The Restoration of Russia's Security State and the Enduring Legacy of the KGB, who has been investigating the Russian Secret Service for a decade, says The Kremlin doesn't even bother to ivestigate.The murder of campaigning Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya, shot at her apart-ment block in 2006, is a prime example.
The New Nobility is an unnerving look at the real power behind the new Russia.