Salisbury

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Salisbury

, town, England
Salisbury (sôlzˈbərē) or New Sarum (sârˈəm), town (1991 pop. 36,890), Wiltshire, S England. A market town, Salisbury was founded in 1220 when the bishopric was moved there from Old Sarum. Squares or “checkers” are characteristic of the regular plan of the town. Industries include cattle and poultry marketing, brewing, leatherwork, and printing. The cathedral, a splendid example of Early English architecture with the highest spire in England (404 ft/123 m), was built mainly between 1220 and 1260. Some of the materials were brought from the razed cathedral of Old Sarum. The 13th-century palace of the bishops, numerous medieval churches and other old buildings, and the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum are of interest. There is a teacher-training college and a theological college. The town is the Melchester of Thomas Hardy's Wessex novels. Stonehenge is 10 mi (16 km) to the north.

Salisbury

, cities, United States

Salisbury. 1 City (1990 pop. 20,592), seat of Wicomico co., Md., on the Eastern Shore, at the head of the Wicomico River; settled 1732, inc. 1872. Poultry raising and processing is the major industry. Clothing, machinery, and boats are manufactured. The city is also a trade center for the Eastern Shore. Salisbury Univ. is there.

2 City (1990 pop. 23,087), seat of Rowan co., W central N.C., in the Piedmont industrial region; inc. 1770. There is food processing, and machinery, furniture, electrical and medical equipment, building materials, textiles and apparel, aluminum, and chemicals are manufactured. Salisbury is the seat of Catawba College and Livingstone College. The city has a number of 18th- and 19th-century buildings, churches, and homes. The national cemetery in Salisbury was the site of one of the largest Confederate prison camps during the Civil War; approximately 11,700 Union soldiers are buried there.

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Salisbury

 

(also New Sarum), a city in southern Great Britain. Located on the Avon River, in Wiltshire. Population, 35,500 (1973). Salisbury has enterprises for the production of foodstuffs and light-industry enterprises. The city is a tourist site.

Salisbury has a grid street plan that developed in the Middle Ages. Architectural monuments include a Gothic cathedral (1220–66; spire, c. 1320–30), the Bishops’ Palace (13th century), the Poultry Cross trade building (c. 1335), and numerous medieval houses. The Museum of Salisbury and South Wilts has a collection of local antiquities.

REFERENCE

The City of Salisbury. London, 1957.

Salisbury

 

a city in Southern Rhodesia. Population, including suburbs, 477,000 (1972), of which approximately three-fourths is African. Salisbury was founded in 1890 by English settlers and was named in honor of the Third Marquess of Salisbury. In 1923 it became the capital of the self-governing colony of Southern Rhodesia. From 1953 to 1963 it was also the capital of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland.

Salisbury is linked by rail with the ports of Beira and Lourenço Marques in Mozambique. It is also a junction for highways and air routes. An important center for trade, industry, and finance, the city produces tobacco, foodstuffs (including sugar), textiles, clothing, chemicals, metal products, and furniture. It also has a motor-vehicle assembly plant and a large tobacco market. Gold is mined in the environs of Salisbury.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Salisbury

1
Robert Gascoyne Cecil , 3rd Marquess of Salisbury. 1830--1903, British statesman; Conservative prime minister (1885--86; 1886--92; 1895--1902). His greatest interest was in foreign and imperial affairs

Salisbury

2
1. the former name (until 1982) of Harare
2. a city in S Australia: an industrial suburb of N Adelaide. Pop.: 112 344 (1998 est.)
3. a city in S England, in SE Wiltshire: nearby Old Sarum was the site of an Early Iron Age hill fort; its cathedral (1220--58) has the highest spire in England. Pop.: 43 355 (2001)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Kate Heusser, 44, (pictured right with host Chris Tarrant) recent- ly became the first woman and only the second British contestant to scoop pounds 500,000 for knowing that New Sarum was the former name for Salisbury.
Asked: "New Sarum is the former name of which city?" Kate went 50:50 and was left with Salisbury or Shrewsbury.
She then answered another two questions before the pounds 500,000 puzzler, "New Sarum is the former name of which city?"