New Urbanism

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Related to New Urbanist: New urbanism

New Urbanism

An approach to designing cities, towns, and neighborhoods that tries to reduce traffic and eliminate sprawl. Although the term New Urbanism emerged during the late 1980s and early 1990s, its principles are much older.
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She and other New Urbanists simply argue that developers--and their architects--would benefit from opening up new markets by catering to many people who want to live in places guided by traditional, authentically sustainable patterns of building.
adopt form-based codes, the New Urbanist movement should look to new
The second type of new urbanist community is the transit-oriented
The New Urbanist focus on form over use is not a new development; rather, it is a return to the kind of planning that has been used since ancient times.
DOCKSIDE GREEN) A New Urbanist community using clean energy that broke the North American record with its initial LEED Platinum rating.
Large-scale, Soviet-era residential districts outside the city center defy the New Urbanist principles of mixed-use, diversity, and connectivity.
The prototypical new urbanist community is Florida's Seaside, which Duany and Plater-Zyberk began designing in 1979 for the 80-acre coastal parcel's developer, Robert S.
The "walkable," "neotraditional" neighborhood is the most familiar New Urbanist leitmotif.
Predating the green movement, the New Urbanist movement marks the building industry's return to traditional block and alley living.
Colorado's New Urbanist communities, or developments, are multiplying faster than jackrabbits in spring.
Recently, the New Urbanist movement in architecture and in law has tried to answer this question by revitalizing traditional center cities and preventing sprawl through higher density areas more dependent on the bicycle than the automobile.
The movement is dominated by architects, and new urbanist coding consequently relies heavily on detailed architectural design standards.

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