New Year for Trees

New Year for Trees

Around December 23
Today, several groups in Great Britain and Ireland practice what they believe to be ancient Druidism. They hold Druidic festivals at the beginning of spring, summer, autumn and winter. They observe December 23 as the New Year for Trees, because it falls right after the Winter Solstice, which marks the rebirth of the sun and the start of a new year according to the tree calendar.
See also Tu Bishvat
SOURCES:
RelHolCal-2004, p. 270
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thursday, January 16th was the Jewish New Year for Trees.
28 article about the Jewish holiday of Tu b'Shvat, or the New Year for Trees ("Celebrating trees in a New Year").
The official signing ceremony at Manhattan's 14th Street Y preceded Tu B'Shvat, the Jewish new year for trees.
Dear Tree" focuses on the time of year for growth and blossoming, and is a perfect gift for Tu B'Shavat or the Hebrew New Year for Trees, or any time of year.
A holiday in the Hebrew month of Shevat marking the New Year for Trees, the time when the earliest blooming trees in Israel start to flower.
Next week, Jews all over the world will be celebrating the New Year for trees.
Celebrating the New Year for trees would probably seem quite strange and insignificant until we take a closer look.
The holiday, also known as the New Year for Trees, began at sundown Friday and will end at sundown today.
The New Year for Trees comes at a time when the fate of a 400-year-old oak tree in suburban Stevenson Ranch, dubbed Old Glory, is a concern for many members of Temple Beth Ami, Watson said.
The little fern was among the plants acknowledged Sunday by a small group of Jewish people who visited Mount Pisgah for a guided tour to mark Tu B'Shvat, the New Year for Trees, a lesser-known but millennia-old annual Jewish celebration, which started at sundown Friday.
But the Northridge congregation might feel so inclined after they take part in a hands-on celebration of the Jewish New Year for Trees.
In the 14th century, a group of Jewish mystics in Israel felt that more should be done to observe the New Year for Trees.